Linderhof Palace

Linderhof, Germany

Linderhof is the smallest of the three palaces built by King Ludwig II of Bavaria and the only one which he lived to see completed.

Ludwig II, who was crowned king in 1864, began his building activities in 1867-1868 by redesigning his rooms in the Munich Residenz and laying the foundation stone of Neuschwanstein Castle. In 1868 he was already making his first plans for Linderhof. However, neither the palace modelled on Versailles that was to be sited on the floor of the valley nor the large Byzantine palace envisaged by Ludwig II were ever built.

Instead, the new building developed around the forester's house belonging to his father Maximilian II, which was located in the open space in front of the present palace and was used by the king when crown prince on hunting expeditions with his father. Linderhof Palace, the eventual result of a long period of building and rebuilding, is the only large palace King Ludwig II lived to see completed.

In 1869 Ludwig II had the forester's house rebuilt and appointed as the 'Royal Lodge'. In 1870, under the supervision of the court building director Georg Dollmann, a wing with a single axis was added. While this extension was still being completed, the original plans for the building were substantially revised.

From spring 1871 a second wing was built to match the first extension, with a bedroom forming the connection between the two wings. A wooden staircase on the west side provided access to the u-shaped complex built around an open courtyard, and the Royal Lodge thus became superfluous; the initial retention of this building indicates the king's emotional attachment to it.

The complex thus created forms the core of the palace. Its upper floor was a wooden post and beam construction clad with boards, while the lower floor was plastered; because of the wooden structures it was known as the 'Alpine Hut Building'. Its simple exterior, however, gave no hint of the splendour inside.

An overall architectural solution was however necessary to unite the results of the piecemeal construction process. In February 1873, King Ludwig II approved a plan which established the final design of the palace. First the wooden construction was clad with solid stone and covered with a cross-shaped complex of new roofs. This section of the building formed the core of the new palace, but it still had no interior staircase.

On 20.1.1874 the king gave permission for the 'Royal Lodge' to be moved to its present location, around 200 metres away, and the new south tract was built in its place. It was only now that the exterior of the palace acquired its final form, and the vestibule and staircase were incorporated in the interior. By 1876 work on the interior of the south tract was also complete.

The transformation of the 'Alpine Hut Building' into the 'Royal Villa' had marked consequences for its surroundings. In 1874 the final plans for the park were submitted by court garden director Carl Joseph von Effner.

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Details

Founded: 1868
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bárbara Stalba (2 years ago)
It's a super cute castle. It's extremely well cared, there are lots of details. The tour is guided by a native person who tells all the history ( its amazing), and if you don't speak German there are books with the story of the castle in lots of other languages. Besides the nature around the castle is fantastic!!
nicole barrow (2 years ago)
Was so Beautiful inside. Most of it is original!! Porcelain candle sticks, Embroidered silk,24 karat covered frames and walls, tapestries, carved ivory, marble, vases, and statues. So glad we went!!
wendy crispell (2 years ago)
Smaller palace of King Ludwig. No pictures allowed but I managed to sneak this angelic sunburst. I highly suggest the VIP tour from Munich that gives a detailed tour of this Versailles inspired castle and grounds. The stories and legends of this castle are fascinating.
E P (2 years ago)
Decadent and very interesting. The rooms are plentiful and small. There is one that is covered in mirrors, like Versailles (where a lot of Ludwig’s inspiration came from), and even a table that can be dropped down into the kitchen and then lifted back up to serve meals. The grounds are equally beautiful and have great gardens and a hunting lodge. You can take a tour of the castle and then explore the grounds on your own.
Yuki Atago (2 years ago)
Went in to a guided tour in a small castle, it’s a place to pass time and take some photo, rather out side the city so nothing much around, if you like to stroll and take pictures, this is definitely the place to do so. But expect a couple hours bus drive to go and return back to city
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