Innsbruck Cathedral

Innsbruck, Austria

Innsbruck Cathedral was built between 1717 and 1724 on the site of a 12th-century Romanesque church. The interior is enclosed by three domed vaults spanning the nave, and a dome with lantern above the chancel. With its lavish Baroque interior, executed in part by the Asam brothers, St. James is considered among the most important Baroque buildings in the Tyrol.

Innsbruck Cathedral is notable for two important treasures. The painting Maria Hilf (Mary of Succor) by Lucas Cranach the Elder from c. 1530 is displayed above the main altar. It is considered among the most venerated Marian images in Christendom. The cathedral also contains in the north aisle the canopied tomb of Archduke Maximilian III of Austria, Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights, dating from 1620. The cathedral was heavily damaged during World War II, but was fully restored within a few years.

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Details

Founded: 1717-1724
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Felix Keller (12 months ago)
Currently under renovation
János Bencsik (2 years ago)
Fascinating must see place.
백수1티어 (2 years ago)
Very great. You must going here. God.
Leica G (3 years ago)
Beautiful cathedral. Worth a visit. And remember to buy a €1 ticket from the machine inside the cathedral if you’re taking photos.
Lee Minett (3 years ago)
Beautiful and ornate baroque cathedral, situated in the heart of Innsbruck's old town. There's a fee of €1 to take photos. The crypt is open for prayers only within the main opening hours.
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