Innsbruck Cathedral

Innsbruck, Austria

Innsbruck Cathedral was built between 1717 and 1724 on the site of a 12th-century Romanesque church. The interior is enclosed by three domed vaults spanning the nave, and a dome with lantern above the chancel. With its lavish Baroque interior, executed in part by the Asam brothers, St. James is considered among the most important Baroque buildings in the Tyrol.

Innsbruck Cathedral is notable for two important treasures. The painting Maria Hilf (Mary of Succor) by Lucas Cranach the Elder from c. 1530 is displayed above the main altar. It is considered among the most venerated Marian images in Christendom. The cathedral also contains in the north aisle the canopied tomb of Archduke Maximilian III of Austria, Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights, dating from 1620. The cathedral was heavily damaged during World War II, but was fully restored within a few years.

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Founded: 1717-1724
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

V Plo (2 years ago)
Too turistic not a true "woke" vibe
R3gistrato E3 (2 years ago)
Top 3 place to visit in Innsbruck
Léo Etlesbas (2 years ago)
Very nice church!
Benedict Uy (2 years ago)
One of the few churches we managed to walk inside. The interior was quite nice and from memory had quite a lot of small side statues and relics on the side. If you wanted to take photos inside the church you had to pay. Otherwise, it was a nice church to walk around and look.
Phui Chen Pang (3 years ago)
Very nice and fine architecture and finishing church. Recommend to visit and have a look. 1euro charges for photograhing inside the church with self bring device, valid for 1 hour.
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