The Goldenes Dachl (Golden Roof) is a landmark structure of Innsbruck, considered the city's most famous symbol. Completed in 1500, the roof was decorated with 2,738 fire-gilded copper tiles for Emperor Maximilian I to mark his wedding to Bianca Maria Sforza. The Emperor and his wife used the balcony to observe festivals, tournaments, and other events that took place in the square below.

The entire oriel is decorated in sculpted reliefs and mural paintings. The first-floor balustrade is adorned with eight sculpted coats of arms, six facing the square and two flanking panels, representing Maximilian's territories. Above the coats of arms are frescoes by Jörg Kölderer, painted in 1500, showing two knights bearing heraldic flags representing the Holy Roman Empire and Tyrol.

The second-floor balustrade is decorated in eight sculpted reliefs, six facing the square and two flanking panels, depicting various images associated with Maximilian's life. The two central reliefs show Maximilian. The one on the left shows the Emperor with his second wife Bianca Maria Sforza on the left holding an apple, and his beloved first wife Maria of Burgundy on the right. The other central relief shows the Emperor with his court jester and his chancellor.

The frescoes that adorn the interior of the loggia were also painted by Jörg Kölderer and show scenes from the aristocratic life of that time.

The building that bears the Goldenes Dachl was constructed by Archduke Friedrich IV in the early 15th century as the residence of the Tyrolean sovereigns. The Goldenes Dachl was designed to serve as a royal box where the Emperor and his imperial entourage could sit in state and enjoy festivals, tournaments, and other events that took place in the square below.

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    Founded: 1500
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    ニタワンNitavanh (18 months ago)
    Nice spot to see the whole view of the area. It’s narrow on top but comfortable enough to walk around without bag. If you have backpack it might not comfortable for other to walk pass you at the top area. The view from there is pretty good.
    Dana Pavel (18 months ago)
    Love Innsbruck's city center with its golden roof and the souveniers shops around that area
    Nuraini Darmayanty (19 months ago)
    What a lovely evening walk. I just love the overall ambience. Maybe it's because I visited at a convenience situation and time.
    Frank S (20 months ago)
    Interesting history of this building with the Golden Roof over the balcony. Looking out onto a small square which was full of Xmas markets and a giant Xmas Tree. The atmosphere is wonderful with lots of people, interesting smells from the many food and beverage stalls a moving light projection onto the surrounding buildings and 5 or more musicians playing Xmas Carol's from the Golden Roof balcony. We came here at least once every day we were in in Innsbruck as the atmosphere was so wonderful. Unfortunately the museum in the building was closed during the time we were there.
    Rebecca Rodriguez (20 months ago)
    I came to Innsbruck during Christmas so I got to experience the Christmas market and the crowds. It was fun and different. During the evening when I was there (a few days before Christmas) we were serenaded by a brass quartet from the Golden Roof. I’m not sure if you can go inside but it was a sight to view from the outside. Hotel rooms on the Main Street there also have a great view of the Golden Roof.
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