St. Lorenz Basilica is a baroque minor Basilica and the former abbey church of the Benedictine Kempten Abbey. A church was built on the site in the 13th century but was burned down in 1478.

Roman Giel of Gielsberg, the Abbot of Kempten, commissioned the master builder Michael Beer from Graubünden to build a new church to serve the parish and monastery. The foundation stone of the Basilica of St. Lawrence was laid on 13 April 1652. This was one of the first large churches built in Germany after the end of the Thirty Years' War.

Michael Beer built the nave, the ground floor of the towers and the choir. He was succeeded by Johann Serro on 24 March 1654. The church was consecrated on 12 May 1748.

In 1803 the monastery was dissolved and the church became a purely parish church. In 1900 the twin towers were finally completed. They were build of concrete which is heavier than the used material before that time. Cracks at the connections to the main building are the result of the completed towers.

In 1969 Pope Paul VI bestowed the honorary title of basilica minor.

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Details

Founded: 1652-1748
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrew Gray (2 years ago)
Pretty, worth popping in
Cuong Than (2 years ago)
Stop by around noon for a break. It was a Sunday they had a mass on walked inside it was spectacular! Quite dreamy. Next to the church food market with a few food trucks around the fountain. Tried a few it was great! Had truffle gnocchi with generous shaving of truffle it was a highlight of the foodie experience. Spoke to one of the truffle specialist they offer truffle hunting tours but we are on. Schedule maybe for next time.
MIKHAIL KUPTCOV (3 years ago)
Central church in Kempten
Omu Qibutzu (3 years ago)
Nice places to visit.
J Buck (4 years ago)
basilika in the calm reagion of kempten, very relaxing atmosphere and great people around
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