Jasna Góra Monastery

Częstochowa, Poland

The Jasna Góra Monastery is the most famous Polish shrine to the Virgin Mary and the country's greatest place of pilgrimage – for many its spiritual capital. The image of the Black Madonna of Częstochowa, also known as Our Lady of Częstochowa, to which miraculous powers are attributed, is Jasna Góra's most precious treasure. The site is one of Poland's official national Historic Monuments.

Founded in 1382 by Pauline monks who came from Hungary at the invitation of Władysław, Duke of Opole. The monastery has been a pilgrimage destination for hundreds of years, and it contains the most important icon of the Virgin Mary in this part of Europe. The icon, depicting the Mother of God with the Christ Child, is known as the Black Madonna of Częstochowa or Our Lady of Częstochowa, which is widely venerated and credited with many miracles. Among these, it is credited with miraculously saving the Jasna Góra monastery during a siege that took place at the time of The Deluge, a 17th-century Swedish invasion. The event stimulated the Polish resistance. The Poles could not immediately change the course of the war but after an alliance with the Crimean Khanate they repulsed the Swedes. Shortly thereafter, in the cathedral of Lviv, on April 1, 1656, Jan Kazimierz, the King of Poland, solemnly pronounced his vow to consecrate the country to the protection of the Mother of God and proclaimed Her the Patron and Queen of the lands in his kingdom.

Since the Middle Ages, every year thousands of Poles go in pilgrim groups to visit Jasna Góra. There are typically numerous pilgrims and tourists at Jasna Góra Monastery, and the volume of excited voices can be high. However, upon entering the Monastery, it is expected etiquette for visitors to be silent or as quiet as possible out of respect. Often, there is a long line of people who wait to approach the shrine of Our Lady. Upon arriving at the location of the shrine where one would pass in front of the icon of Our Lady, it is expected and a sign of respect for pilgrims to drop to their knees, and traverse the anterior of the shrine on their knees.

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Founded: 1382
Category: Religious sites in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Benon Kosta (2 years ago)
Must see place in Częstochowa/Poland
Alfredo António (2 years ago)
Is a beautiful place, with beautiful buildings and for the religious catholics, is a place that they should visit at least one time on their lives... Religiously is compared with Fatima Sanctuary, in Portugal, but really more full of beauty and things, to see...
Greg Hayward (2 years ago)
Lovely place! The Basilica has to seen to be believed!! It's beautiful!
Ren P (2 years ago)
Highly decorated monastry with a famous painting of Black Madonna that is renown for healing miracles. Easy to walk around, free toilets, sacraments in various languages during the day.
luca falcone (2 years ago)
I prayed. I confessed. I received the Holy Communion. What else can I say? (-: Just do it. That's it. Full stop (o:
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