Jasna Góra Monastery

Częstochowa, Poland

The Jasna Góra Monastery is the most famous Polish shrine to the Virgin Mary and the country's greatest place of pilgrimage – for many its spiritual capital. The image of the Black Madonna of Częstochowa, also known as Our Lady of Częstochowa, to which miraculous powers are attributed, is Jasna Góra's most precious treasure. The site is one of Poland's official national Historic Monuments.

Founded in 1382 by Pauline monks who came from Hungary at the invitation of Władysław, Duke of Opole. The monastery has been a pilgrimage destination for hundreds of years, and it contains the most important icon of the Virgin Mary in this part of Europe. The icon, depicting the Mother of God with the Christ Child, is known as the Black Madonna of Częstochowa or Our Lady of Częstochowa, which is widely venerated and credited with many miracles. Among these, it is credited with miraculously saving the Jasna Góra monastery during a siege that took place at the time of The Deluge, a 17th-century Swedish invasion. The event stimulated the Polish resistance. The Poles could not immediately change the course of the war but after an alliance with the Crimean Khanate they repulsed the Swedes. Shortly thereafter, in the cathedral of Lviv, on April 1, 1656, Jan Kazimierz, the King of Poland, solemnly pronounced his vow to consecrate the country to the protection of the Mother of God and proclaimed Her the Patron and Queen of the lands in his kingdom.

Since the Middle Ages, every year thousands of Poles go in pilgrim groups to visit Jasna Góra. There are typically numerous pilgrims and tourists at Jasna Góra Monastery, and the volume of excited voices can be high. However, upon entering the Monastery, it is expected etiquette for visitors to be silent or as quiet as possible out of respect. Often, there is a long line of people who wait to approach the shrine of Our Lady. Upon arriving at the location of the shrine where one would pass in front of the icon of Our Lady, it is expected and a sign of respect for pilgrims to drop to their knees, and traverse the anterior of the shrine on their knees.

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Founded: 1382
Category: Religious sites in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vina (7 months ago)
Beautiful monastery, the place is full of history (religious and to the Polish nation). Great treasure here is the icon of the Black Madonna (Our Lady of Czestochowa).
Grace L (8 months ago)
A large monastery where they experienced lots of miracles from the image of “Black Madonna”. There was a mass going on and it was very crowded. The tour we joined was able to let us walk around during mass and all the way to the back where we can see the image
DrHU Farrell (9 months ago)
Wonderful experience, can be very busy so plan in advance to see the unveiling of our Lady of Czestochowa as can be quite crowded!
Mufaddal Ezzi (11 months ago)
Make sure you go on the free times as mass times it is extremely crowded and you barely will get a chance to see or enter the church. Also food and drink options are very expensive to polish average standards. The landscape is pretty beautiful well maintained.
Dc Dug (12 months ago)
We went late Sunday evening ~8pm for a quick visit. Most places were closed as it was late, but we liked the two churches we saw. We didn't pay anything for entry or parking which was in a car park across the road.
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