Olsztyn Castle Ruins

Olsztyn, Poland

The ruins of the 14th-century Olsztyn castle are one of the biggest attractions of the area. The castle, located on a hill, among limestone rocks, is part of the Trail of the Eagles' Nests. It belonged to a system of fortifications, built by King Kazimierz Wielki, to protect western Lesser Poland from Czechs, to whom Silesia belonged at that time. For some time, as a fee, it belonged to Prince Wladyslaw Opolczyk. Taken away from him in 1396, the castle was then handed by King Wladyslaw Jagello to a local nobleman, Jan Odrowąż of Szczekociny. The castle was invaded several times by Silesian princes in the 15th century, and with the advancement of warfare, its fortifications became obsolete. In 1655, it was captured by the Swedes, and since then, it became a ruin. In 1722, it was partly demolished, with bricks used to build a parish church at Olsztyn. Currently, only fragments of defensive walls remain. The most impressive still standing part of the castle is a 35-meter round tower, built in the 13th century, which served as a prison.

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Address

Zamkowa 14, Olsztyn, Poland
See all sites in Olsztyn

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Poland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

M Drogowski (3 years ago)
Nice views, could use some renovation :p
Michel Exters (3 years ago)
Really nice balloon festival. Over 25 airballoons that went into the air.
Magdalena Dobosz (3 years ago)
This place is getting better every year.... worth to visit. Well organised events
Justyna Kosmulska (3 years ago)
One of my most beloved places on Earth. I come back here every year - for breath, for space, for thoughts on history. Totally picturesque. Nice start for further exploration of the Polish Jura. Just avoid weekends, might be crowded. A weekday morning is best.
Marta Perez (3 years ago)
Beautiful place, there are only ruins but nevertheless nice to visit and easy to reach by bus.
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