Banz Abbey, now known as Schloss Banz, is a former Benedictine monastery. It was founded in about 1070 by Countess Alberada of Schweinfurt and her husband, Count Hermann of Habsberg-Kastl, and until the secularisation of 1803 was the oldest monastery on the upper Main. In the late Middle Ages and until 1575 only members of the nobility were accepted as monks.

After the Thirty Years' War the abbey had to be re-built. The abbots Eucharius Weiner and Kilian Düring commissioned Johann Leonhard Dientzenhofer and after his death in 1707, his brother Johann Dientzenhofer. Construction began in 1698. The church, built in of Baroque style, was consecrated in 1719. The interior is unexpectedly built, not with right angles, but with a series of ellipses. The main altar, the chancel and the statues of saints in the church and on the facade are by Balthasar Esterbauer; the ceiling frescoes are by Melchior Steidl. The choir stalls were made by the court cabinet maker and ebonist of Schönborn, Johann Georg Nesstfell.

In the second half of the 18th century Banz Abbey was known throughout the Holy Roman Empire as a place of Catholic enlightenment and for the scholarship of its monks. This did not save it from secularisation and dissolution in 1803.

In 1813 Duke Wilhelm in Bavaria, acquired the former abbey premises, which were thereafter known as Schloss Banz.

In 1933 Duke Ludwig Wilhelm in Bavaria, sold the buildings to the Community of the Holy Angels, an order dedicated to the spiritual care of expatriate Germans. Since 1978 the former monastery has been in the possession of the Hanns Seidel Foundation, an organisation closely associated with the political party the CSU in Bavaria, and is used as a conference centre. It also accommodates a collection of fossils and other curiosities, such as Egyptian mummies.

The estate of the former monastery, including vast forests, is today owned by Duke Max Emanuel's eldest daughter Sophie, Hereditary Princess of Liechtenstein.

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Details

Founded: c. 1070
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.hss.de

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sebastian Scott (2 years ago)
Johnny Seidel Foundation at its best!
Phisten (2 years ago)
Very good service and nice Waiters. Food was excellent anderen looked very good
Bernhard Wagner (2 years ago)
Silent place with a wonderful view over the valee!
Easton Dillehay (2 years ago)
Absolutely stunning architecture. Plan your visit right and be sure to come during an organ performance. The sound reverberating off the walls is something you will never forget. Beautiful spot on the Main.
Jacek Redlinski (3 years ago)
Hard to give a right review as only been outside. From what I see, lovely place
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