Bamberg Cathedral

Bamberg, Germany

The Bamberg Cathedral is a late Romanesque building with four imposing towers. It was founded in 1002 by the emperor Henry II, finished in 1012 and consecrated on May 6, 1012. It was later partially destroyed by fire in 1081. The new cathedral, built by St. Otto of Bamberg, was consecrated in 1111, and in the 13th century received its present late-Romanesque form. Due to its long construction process, several styles were used in different parts of the cathedral, particularly the Romanesque and Gothic ones. Between these two styles is the Transitional style, and this is the style which is characteristic of the nave.

The cathedral is about 94 m long, 28 m broad, 26 m high, and the four towers are each about 81 m high. Of its many works of art may be mentioned the magnificent marble tomb of the founder and his wife, the empress Cunigunde, considered the masterpiece of the sculptor Tilman Riemenschneider, and carved between 1499 and 1513.

Another treasure of the cathedral is an equestrian statue called the Bamberg Horseman (Bamberger Reiter). People have tried to guess for years who this knight on horseback really was. During the cathedral’s history people have often made up stories about who he was. The Romantics thought he was a German emperor from the Hohenstaufen family. The Nazis thought he was a knight who symbolized German perfection, looking towards the east for new lands to conquer. This was Nazi propaganda. The knight on the statue does not, in fact, look east at all. It is now thought that he was probably the 11th century Hungarian king Stephen I. Modern technology has made it possible for us to know what the original colours were, and this has helped scientists to identify him. The sculptor carved only his mask into the sculpture, leaving his identity a mystery.

Pope Clement II (1005–47) is buried in the Bamberg Cathedral. He was the local bishop before he became Pope in 1046, but he died in 1047 after having been pope for only twelve months. Bamberg Cathedral is the site of the only papal burial outside of Italy and France.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Domstraße, Bamberg, Germany
See all sites in Bamberg

Details

Founded: 1002-1111
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Ottonian Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Raoul Coutinho (10 months ago)
A beautiful church with an extremely calming experience when you sit inside. Recommend lighting candles and looking at the beautiful decorations when here.
Michel - (15 months ago)
They make you pay for a special kind of mask, because a surgical mask is not enough, you pay, you get in, and the staff only wear surgical masks. What a joke. As for the interior beauty, it’s okay, nothing more, especially compared to churches in other European cities.
Endre x (15 months ago)
Beautiful cathedral, check it out if you're around.
Rethin R (16 months ago)
Visiting Bamberg will be worth a days time.I was really surprised by the warmth of the people here and their welcoming culture, be it in a restaurant or outside.Best places to visit include the cathedral, you will be taken back by the ancient architecture and the warmth of the interiors there.You can offer a euro and light the candles if you wish to.Also you could take a walk around and see the old town, residence and the rose garden.
Paul Lee (16 months ago)
It's a historical church with beautiful architecture is one of the many structure in this city.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.