Bamberg Historic City Centre

Bamberg, Germany

Bamberg is located in Upper Franconia on the river Regnitz close to its confluence with the river Main. Its historic city center is a listed UNESCO world heritage site.

Bamberg is a good example of a central European town with a basically early medieval plan and many surviving ecclesiastical and secular buildings of the medieval period. When Henry II, Duke of Bavaria, became King of Germany in 1007 he made Bamberg the seat of a bishopric, intended to become a 'second Rome'. Of particular interest is the way in which the present town illustrates the link between agriculture (market gardens and vineyards) and the urban distribution centre.

From the 10th century onwards, Bamberg became an important link with the Slav peoples, especially those of Poland and Pomerania. During its period of greatest prosperity, from the 12th century onwards, the architecture of this town strongly influenced northern Germany and Hungary. In the late 18th century Bamberg was the centre of the Enlightenment in southern Germany, with eminent philosophers and writers such as Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and E.T.A. Hoffmann living there.

Bamberg extends over seven hills, each crowned by a beautiful church. This has led to Bamberg being called the 'Franconian Rome'.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in Germany
Historical period: Ottonian Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Norma Brown (17 months ago)
Fabulously opulent and interesting. Wonderful local attraction.
Brent (18 months ago)
Beautiful relaxing place to visit. Another one of my favorites
Linda Roe (2 years ago)
We were fortunate enough to have lunch at the Altes Rathaus Bamburg. Our table overlooked the river and we could see the bridge that we had crossed earlier that had a spectacular view of this restaurant. The food was delicious at this Bavarian restaurant. Our entire Viking riverboat was served without a problem and they had room for many other guests. Very impressive.
Dianne Christensen (2 years ago)
The building was placed on an artificial island, supposedly because the bishop didn’t want to relinquish any land. An armed conflict between the mayor and the bishop ended with an agreement that the citizens couldn’t rebuild their burned-down city hall on land. Tall arched bridges connect the island on either side to this city center on a river. Gorgeous place. Don’t miss it.
Vanessa Coronel (2 years ago)
Amazing food, beer, drinks, Service! The tables by the river are specially beautifull. I really enjoyed my lunch here. All ingredients were super fresh and the portions big. Recommended!
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