Kipfenberg Castle

Kipfenberg, Germany

Kipfenberg Castle was built in the 12th century and was owned by the counts of Grögling-Hirschberg. In 1803 it was moved to the possession of state. Bodo Ebhardt restored and rebuilt the castle in the early 1900s. Today Kipfenberg is privately owned, but there is a Romans and Bavarians Museum in the outer bailey.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

3.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tom Mawn (3 years ago)
While bicycle touring along the Altmuhltal Radweg, we stopped for lunch. Excellent, crispy yet tender schnitzel, lusciously seasoned lamb shank that fell off the bone and melted in your mouth, richly flavored potato salad, and for desert, homemade, meringue topped, rhubarb kuchen, which, although we were full from our entrees, we somehow managed to make disappear as soon as it touched the table. Excellent service, great patio dining under umbrellas, and clean restrooms. This was a real find, do not miss it.
Sylvain Marchand (3 years ago)
Good restaurant and hotel. Nice place. Good biers also!
Naumce Trajceski (3 years ago)
:-S
Guilherme Schneider (4 years ago)
A great hotel in Kipfenberg. Very cozy bedrooms and a friendly environment. Delicious pizza on restaurant and also delicious breakfest.
Lis Przemyslaw (5 years ago)
Breakfast was perfect. Room looks ok as well
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