Germanisches Nationalmuseum

Nuremberg, Germany

The Germanisches Nationalmuseum, founded in 1852, houses a large collection of items relating to German culture and art extending from prehistoric times through to the present day. With current holdings of about 1.2 million objects, the Germanisches Nationalmuseum is Germany's largest museum of cultural history.

Particular highlights include works of Albrecht Dürer, Veit Stoß and Rembrandt, the earliest surviving terrestrial globe, the first pocket watch in the world as well as the largest collection of historical musical instrument in Europe.

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Details

Founded: 1852
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anna Pató (10 months ago)
This is a fantastic museum! Not crowded at all. Three floors and really nice exhibition from antient times until nowadays. I recommend it!
Irene Cotrina (11 months ago)
Nothing to write home about. A bit of everything, i guess it was a mistake to visit without the use of a guide... Lack of organization doesn't help also. Nevertheless, I found the museum shop very well stocked and interesting. Lots of history and art books, but also novels and best sellers.
Brian Stefanko (11 months ago)
Awesome mix of old and new history. The building encompasses more space than any I've been in, except perhaps the Smithsonian. Really great section on warfare, including tons weapons and armor from several periods, to include some pretty unique pieces that I had never seen. Highly recommend.
Denis Krumov (11 months ago)
The place is big enough to spend whole day (if not, even more) getting lost between all the wonderful expositions. You can spend a couple of hours, just having a quick look here and there, or have a realy big, time-consuming in depth tour, reading the items info signs and just swim between the eras. Seriously recommend the audio guide!
Lera Ost (2 years ago)
Very interesting place! Great expositions and no ordinary planing of the museum. Didn't have enough time to see everything, better to have at least 2 hours. And also nice museum shop!
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