St. Rochus Cemetery

Nuremberg, Germany

St. Rochus Cemetery (Rochusfriedhof) was created in late 1510s to bury the victims of the plague epidemic of 1517-18. To avoid spreading the disease, city authorities decided to build the cemetery at some distance from the city, so St. Rochus is located outside the old city wall. The cemetery was finally consecrated on 21 March 1519. St. Rochus Chapel was built in 1520–21. The architect was Hans Beheim the Elder, who also built a chapel for Johannisfriedhof, another old Nuremberg cemetery.

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User Reviews

M (12 months ago)
Johannis-Friedhof gefällt mir besser
M K Markey (2 years ago)
History buff? Music Fan? Visit and learn. Summer time best. Pay homage to Johann Christoph Pachelbe while listening to his Canon in D at his grave for he was here ~ 3/7 Mar 1706 buried (there is some contention on the exact date of death).
Quill worker (3 years ago)
Ein schöner Friedhof ein Ort der Stille und Besinnung
Koen Verhaeghe (3 years ago)
Oasis of rest for people staying at the Derag Hotel
Mohammad Alarbash (4 years ago)
Great place for the dead to rest in. It's quite and peaceful. Also good to take pictures.
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