Pädaste Manor

Muhu, Estonia

The written history of Pädaste Manor dates back to the year 1566. On the 25th of June of that year Fredrik II, King of Denmark handed the manor over to the von Knorr family in recognition of services rendered to the Danish Crown. The manor and surrounding farms were an important centre of agricultural activity already by that time.

It must have been much earlier, not long after bishop Albert von Buxhoeveden by decree of Pope Honorius III led the last and decisive battle on Muhu Island against the Estonian heathens that this enchanting site was selected to build a manor.

The origins of the manor go back to the 14th century, some of these ancient walls are still visible at the very heart of the house. In the latter part of the 19th century the house was enlarged considerably and given a new façade, hence the harmonious dimensions and clean lines which give the house it’s character today.

The buildings that frame the court yard were erected between 1870 and 1890, a period of German-Baltic nobles. The manor was a state-owned building from the end of the Second World War until 1986 when it again became private property. Since 1997 The fully renovated manor complex has been turned into a luxury hotel and a spa complex.

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Address

Pädaste küla, Muhu, Estonia
See all sites in Muhu

Details

Founded: 1870-1890
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jörn C. Schneider (10 months ago)
Heaven on earth ...
John Ollila (12 months ago)
Diabolical experience. I had made my original booking through Hyatt due to their partnership with Small Luxury Hotels of the World of which Pädaste Manor is part of. Few days later, I received a message from Hyatt that the property doesn't accept Amex and my reservation was canceled I made another one on SLH's own website and then the property claimed that they were not able to pre-authorizate my HSBC card that I have been using in the Baltics and my reservation was canceled for the second time. They, however, asked if I would like to make a reservation for a dinner? Doesn't make much sense. I made a third reservation through Tablet Hotels when arriving at the Muhu harbor so that they wouldn't have time to cancel it by the time it took to get to the hotel (10 minutes). Quite frankly, at this point, I would have preferred staying somewhere, because it didn't appear that they would like to have paying guests, but a friend with whom I was traveling with had made a prepaid reservation. The check in went fine and I was upgraded and provided a fruit plate. My friend received several calls and emails from the hotel trying to get him to make spa and restaurant bookings. I went to breakfast in the morning and only wanted to have whole wheat toast that they didn't have. Also the teapot's cover always fell off when pouring some. It felt that the property mainly employs trainees from a hospitality school in Estonia. This hotel is not worth the money even when you consider the uniquely setting due to lack of service and common sense.
SGD (2 years ago)
It is obvious that this hotel invest much more to promote itself then working on it's quality and service for customers. We saw the article in a travel magazine and came here for 3 nights. We were very dissapointed. Everything is not on a level of a boutique hotel. There are no pool, no sauna and no sandy beach in the hotel. There are just 4 sunbeds ext to the water but they are occupied from early morning. Especially it is disappointing when you come with children. There are NOTHING to do for them here. Mosquitos and blood drinking animals everywhere ...
SGD (2 years ago)
It is obvious that this hotel invest much more to promote itself then working on it's quality and service for customers. We saw the article in a travel magazine and came here for 3 nights. We were very dissapointed. Everything is not on a level of a boutique hotel. There are no pool, no sauna and no sandy beach in the hotel. There are just 4 sunbeds ext to the water but they are occupied from early morning. Especially it is disappointing when you come with children. There are NOTHING to do for them here. Mosquitos and blood drinking animals everywhere ...
Chantel Rowe (2 years ago)
Really lovely setting, especially down by the water, and a great way to experience the Estonian islands. Staff were very hospitable, and looked after our every need. Areas of improvement - needs a nice bar area and disappointed that the sauna and hot tub were not included for guests (had to pay extra spa fee).
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