Muhu Museum is situated in the historical Koguva village. The museum exhibits the old village school from the 19th century, traditional peasant culture, local school history and traditional textiles. The heart of the museum is Tooma farmstead which is a representative example of Muhu farm architecture. In its outbuildings old agricultural and fishing equipment is exhibited. In the main building, visitors find a small introduction to Juhan Smuul’s life and work. Juhan Smuul was a poet, drama and prose writer, and remarkable author of non-fiction.

Reference: Muhu.info

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Address

Koguva küla, Muhu, Estonia
See all sites in Muhu

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Category: Museums in Estonia

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

aaron boise (2 years ago)
Very interesting view of Estonian culture
Lennart Raun (2 years ago)
If You want to know, how islanders lived hundred years ago, that's the place.
Karin Kirmjõe (2 years ago)
Nice to walk around but nothing too mind blowing and also it was not allowed to go in some rooms, you could only see in from the door.
Jeff Clay (2 years ago)
Whether pasting through Muhu on the way to Saaremaa or staying on Muhu itself, the village and surrounding area of Koguva is a must-see. Super location, great old buildings, a lone windmill, hiking to the shore, etc., it's all wonderful there.
Jaakko Vasko (3 years ago)
Small cozy museum. Great textiles.
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