Loreta is a large pilgrimage destination in Hradčany, a district of Prague. It consists of a cloister, the church of the Lord’s Birth, a Holy Hut and the clock tower with a famous chime.

The construction had started in 1626 and the Holy Hut was blessed on March 25, 1631. The architect was the Italian Giovanni Orsi; the project was financed by a noblewoman Kateřina Benigna of the Lobkowicz family. Fifty years later the place of pilgrimage was already surrounded by cloisters to which after 1740 an upper storey by Kilián Ignác Dientzenhofer.

The Face wall in Baroque style was designed by the architects Christoph Dientzenhofer and Kilian Ignaz Dientzenhofer and added at the beginning of the 18th century.

The chapel is most known for its peal, heard since August 15, 1695. It was constructed during 1694 by watchmaker Peter Neumann from thirty smaller and larger bells.

Today the building also hosts large collection of liturgical tools, mainly monstrances. Exhibitions are occasionally held on the first floor of the cloister.

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Founded: 1626
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

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User Reviews

Jan Kostalek (2 years ago)
Nice historical place which is not soooo crowded as the rest of the rague Castle
Chris Bing (2 years ago)
Beautiful church complex. The bell mechanism is very interesting and it's worth at least walking past to hear it chime. The monstrance with 6200 diamonds is quite impressive. 100 extra to take photos. The audioguide is worthwhile but overlong in places.
Daniel Contador (2 years ago)
If you are in Prague you must visit this church . Very popular and beaultiful . We went there in July 2017 and it was an unforgettable trip.
Michaela Kral (3 years ago)
Gorgeous! I debated stopping here, but decided to make the stop between St. Vitus and going for lunch at Strahov Monastery. I'm so glad I did. This is one of the most beautiful churches I've ever seen and it's easy to imagine this being a popular place hundreds of years ago. I highly recommend a stop here.
Stacy Holt (3 years ago)
Beautiful treasures... ostentatious...crypts...alters and chapels. A lot of history. The Nativity Chapel has a stunning number of cherub statues.
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The Roman emperor Hadrian built a theatre in the center of the town, on a hill, when many buildings in the Roman province of Macedonia were being restored. It began being used during the reign of Antoninus Pius. Inside the theatre there were three animal cages and in the western part a tunnel. The theatre went out of use during the late 4th century AD, when gladiator fights in the Roman Empire were banned, due to the spread of Christianity, the formulation of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the abandonment of, what was then perceived as, pagan rituals and entertainment.

Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

In the early Byzantine period (4th to 6th centuries AD) Heraclea was an important episcopal centre. A small and a great basilica, the bishop"s residence, and a funerary basilica and the necropolis are some of the remains of this period. Three naves in the Great Basilica are covered with mosaics of very rich floral and figurative iconography; these well preserved mosaics are often regarded as fine examples of the early Christian art period.

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