St. George's Basilica

Prague, Czech Republic

St. George's Basilica is the oldest surviving church building within Prague Castle. The basilica was founded by Vratislaus I of Bohemia in 920. It is dedicated to Saint George.

The basilica was substantially enlarged in 973 with the addition of the Benedictine St. George's Abbey. It was rebuilt following a major fire in 1142. The Baroque façade dates from the late 17th century. A Gothic style chapel dedicated to Ludmila of Bohemia holds the tomb of the saint. The shrines of Vratislav and Boleslaus II of Bohemia are also in the basilica. The abbess of this community had the right to crown the Bohemian queens consort.

The building now houses the 19th century Bohemian Art Collection of National Gallery in Prague. It also serves as a concert hall.

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Founded: 920 AD
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tom Wilson (16 months ago)
This place is inside Prague Castle. It can be accessed with main ticket. It is pretty old and beatiful for the time it is built. It is built around 920.
Chaiyot Yetho (18 months ago)
Worth visit to this ancient sanctuary. Learning historic site and indulging in its beautiful heritage.
manideep Bolla (19 months ago)
It is most popular church inthe place it is abstractive to the worldAccording to the Guinness Book of Records, Prague Castle is the largest ancient castle in the world,[1][2] occupying an area of almost 70,000 square metres (750,000 square feet), at about 570 metres (1,870 feet) in length and an average of about 130 metres (430 feet) wide. The castle is among the most visited tourist attractions in Prague attracting over 1.8 million visitors annually
Vivek R (2 years ago)
Beautiful architecture, well maintained and preserved.
Jim Turnbull (2 years ago)
Although dwarfed by the neighbouring cathedral, St. George's Basilica is still impressive in it's own right, with the Romanesque architecture of the facade offering a dramatic contrast to the Gothic styling of St. Vitus'. The interior is comparatively small, but there is no reason not to visit whilst at the castle. Recommended.
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