The museum of Kihnu was established in 1974 into the old schoolhouse. Expositions are divided between four rooms. Two of them are dedicated to the everyday life of the island through centuries: tools, clothes, handicrafts, furniture. The other two are dedicated to the local representatives of naïve art and to other famous men from Kihnu: Theodor Saar, a researcher in the studies of local lore; Enn Uuetoa, a captain and Peeter Rooslaid, a silversmith. All in all the funds of the museum include 700 items. The museum has also a collection of paintings by naivist painters of Kihnu origin and many works by the most famous painter Jaan Oad.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Linaküla küla, Kihnu, Estonia
See all sites in Kihnu

Details

Founded: 1974
Category: Museums in Estonia
Historical period: Soviet Occupation (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Reigo Räim (2 years ago)
Ok
Adam Hewitt (2 years ago)
Really good collection of artifacts of Kihnu life and history. We were lucky to be with a guide though, because few or none of the items have English descriptions. If you've made the effort to get to Kihnu, definitely make the effort to get to the museum while you're there!
Heldur Kajaste (2 years ago)
Very nice and special indeed!
Ragne Kangro (2 years ago)
Very nice interactive museum and had many different types of exhibit methods. Lovely little store also
Pete Watson (2 years ago)
Excellent museum showing Island life. Part of a cultural centre where you might find other things going on such viola classes. Small reception area selllsbf post cards, cds and locally made products. Just the place for some jolly socks.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.