Tõstamaa Manor was first mentioned in 1553 as Testama, when it belonged to the Bishop of Ösel–Wiek. Lated the owners have been the Kursells, Helmersens and Staël von Holsteins. The Early-Classical two-storey main building was built in 1804. During a renovation in 1997, several original painted ceilings were uncovered. The manor was dispossessed in 1919 and since 1921 a local school (Tõstamaa Keskkool) is operating in the main building. The most famous inhabitant of the manor is probably Alexander von Staël-Holstein, who grew up and spent his childhood at the manor.

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Founded: 1804
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kristjan Kask (3 years ago)
Kaunis mõis ning keldrikorrusel "filmimuuseum"
Jyri Liira (3 years ago)
Ilus talvine park
tiit savason (3 years ago)
Guided tour was very informative and interesting. Also there was a nice little museum downstairs.
Herling Mesi (3 years ago)
Väga tore mõis, asjalik tuur ja sõbralik personal. Ja kui tuuri lõpuks mõisa keldrisse jõuad, arvates, et 5viimast minutit tuurist, siis sa eksid. Seal kulub vähemalt pool päeva veel. Varu aega, sest VAU!
M T (4 years ago)
Nice restored manor
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