Tõstamaa Manor was first mentioned in 1553 as Testama, when it belonged to the Bishop of Ösel–Wiek. Lated the owners have been the Kursells, Helmersens and Staël von Holsteins. The Early-Classical two-storey main building was built in 1804. During a renovation in 1997, several original painted ceilings were uncovered. The manor was dispossessed in 1919 and since 1921 a local school (Tõstamaa Keskkool) is operating in the main building. The most famous inhabitant of the manor is probably Alexander von Staël-Holstein, who grew up and spent his childhood at the manor.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1804
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kristjan Kask (4 years ago)
Kaunis mõis ning keldrikorrusel "filmimuuseum"
Jyri Liira (4 years ago)
Ilus talvine park
tiit savason (4 years ago)
Guided tour was very informative and interesting. Also there was a nice little museum downstairs.
Herling Mesi (4 years ago)
Väga tore mõis, asjalik tuur ja sõbralik personal. Ja kui tuuri lõpuks mõisa keldrisse jõuad, arvates, et 5viimast minutit tuurist, siis sa eksid. Seal kulub vähemalt pool päeva veel. Varu aega, sest VAU!
M T (5 years ago)
Nice restored manor
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Gruyères Castle

The Castle of Gruyères is one of the most famous in Switzerland. It was built between 1270 and 1282, following the typical square plan of the fortifications in Savoy. It was the property of the Counts of Gruyères until the bankruptcy of the Count Michel in 1554. His creditors the cantons of Fribourg and Bern shared his earldom. From 1555 to 1798 the castle became residence to the bailiffs and then to the prefects sent by Fribourg.

In 1849 the castle was sold to the Bovy and Balland families, who used the castle as their summer residency and restored it. The castle was then bought back by the canton of Fribourg in 1938, made into a museum and opened to the public. Since 1993, a foundation ensures the conservation as well as the highlighting of the building and the art collection.

The castle is the home of three capes of the Order of the Golden Fleece. They were part of the war booty captured by the Swiss Confederates (which included troops from Gruyères) at the Battle of Morat against Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy in 1476. As Charles the Bold was celebrating the anniversary of his father's death, one of the capes is a black velvet sacerdotal vestment with Philip the Good's emblem sewn into it.

A collection of landscapes by 19th century artists Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Barthélemy Menn and others are on display in the castle.