Basilica of St. Peter and Paul

Prague, Czech Republic

The Basilica of St Peter and St Paul is a neo-Gothic church in Vyšehrad fortress. Originally founded in 1070-1080 by the Czech King Vratislav II, the Romanesque basilica suffered a fire in the year 1249 and has been rebuilt in Gothic and later in neo-Gothic style. The basilica features an impressive stone mosaic above its entry, and its twin 58 m towers can be seen atop a hill to the south from along the Vltava River in central Prague.

The current building itself is a neo-Gothic basilica constructed between 1885 and 1903. The main part of the church consists of a nave with two side aisles; a large choir, sanctuary and apse; and two side rooms which hold a sacristy and a chapel for Panna Maria Šancovská Our Lady of the Ramparts.

History is the dominant element thematically of the interior décor; the history of art, Christianity and the Czech lands are all aspects of the decoration. As a piece of art history the church is something of an exhibition of Gothic, art nouveau and even Baroque pieces.

Along with the design of the building the main altar, the pulpit, and all the smaller altars in the side chapels are neo Gothic as well. They are intricately carved with mini-spires and tracery throughout. Even the organ which sits above the entrance has hollow spires matching those of the western towers. In addition, each chapel contains Gothic revival paintings. The theme of the stained glass windows is the history of Gothic architecture; each window portrays Jesus before a different Gothic or neo-Gothic church. Completing the tribute to the Gothic style is a large fresco at the eastern end of the northern aisle of the first Gothic church to stand on the spot.

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Founded: 1885-1903
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Puch & Derbi Lover (22 months ago)
Best church in Prague, And always the least popular. The whole area around here is worth checking out. The restaurants have god fresh good and beer and the grounds have many nice gardens, buildings and statues.
František Zimmermann (2 years ago)
The Basilica of St. Peter and Paul in Prague at Vyšehrad, was originally an early Romanesque basilica, has been repeatedly rebuilt throughout history, and was significantly influenced by Gothic in the time of Charles IV. and High Baroque in the early eighteenth century. Vyšehrad is an important religious and cultural monument. in Vyšehrad is also a beautiful place for nature walks
Dave Cash ' he-him (2 years ago)
One of the loveliest cathedrals we've seen. Nearly every surface is carefully painted. It's smaller and more intimate than some larger cathedrals, but that only adds to its charm.
Brian Bella (3 years ago)
Beautiful church. It's a little bit outside of the city center but worth the trip
Brian Geisbrecht (3 years ago)
This is a beautifully decorated minor basilica. Its only a short ride on the metro and 5 minutes walk from the closest station. Amazing art inside. Definitely worth the small price of admission!
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