Municipal House (Obecní dům) is a civic building that houses Smetana Hall, a celebrated concert venue, in Prague. The Royal Court palace used to be located on the site of the Municipal House. From 1383 until 1485 the King of Bohemia lived in the property. After 1485, it was abandoned. It was demolished in the early 20th century. Construction of the current building started in 1905 and it opened in 1912. The building was designed by Osvald Polívka and Antonín Balšánek. The Municipal House was the location of the Czechoslovak declaration of independence.

The building is of the Art Nouveau architecture style. The building exterior has allegorical art and stucco. There is a mosaic called Homage to Prague by Karel Špillar over the entrance. On either side are allegorical sculpture groups representing The Degradation of the People and The Resurrection of the People by Ladislav Šaloun. Smetana Hall serves as a concert hall and ballroom. It has a glass dome. There is artwork by Alfons Mucha, Jan Preisler and Max Švabinský, too.

Today, the building is used as concert hall, ballroom, civic building, and as the location of cafes and restaurants. Many of the rooms in the building are closed to the public and open only for guided tours.

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Founded: 1905-1912
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Czech Republic

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

wenyan fu (14 months ago)
Its a very beautiful historic building and one of the symbols of the city of Prague, with multifunction: concert halls, exhibition halls, restaurants and cafes. The Czech restaurant underground is especially recommended, with distinctive features and reasonable prices.
Nirvân Sandner (15 months ago)
Beautiful genuine wall and roof decorum. Has to be seen even if you don't step in the touristy restaurant. Should worth to watch a proper show in there.
Sandy Sharp (15 months ago)
Lovely place for coffee and cake. Really beautiful surroundings and extremely friendly staff. Close to everything in the centre of the old town of Prague
Yannis Simantiras (15 months ago)
Gorgeous building, beautiful ceiling and great acoustic. Really enjoyed the concert with ballet and soprano. Highly recommend you attend a performance here
Gwendydd Hardcastle (16 months ago)
Worth going in. The prices seem a little over the top for the restaurant but the beer hall downstairs is really nice. Having lived in Prague for 7 years and not going in until now - I regret it as the decor is truly beautiful. The American bar also seems like a superb place for a drink and a chat with friends.
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