Municipal House (Obecní dům) is a civic building that houses Smetana Hall, a celebrated concert venue, in Prague. The Royal Court palace used to be located on the site of the Municipal House. From 1383 until 1485 the King of Bohemia lived in the property. After 1485, it was abandoned. It was demolished in the early 20th century. Construction of the current building started in 1905 and it opened in 1912. The building was designed by Osvald Polívka and Antonín Balšánek. The Municipal House was the location of the Czechoslovak declaration of independence.

The building is of the Art Nouveau architecture style. The building exterior has allegorical art and stucco. There is a mosaic called Homage to Prague by Karel Špillar over the entrance. On either side are allegorical sculpture groups representing The Degradation of the People and The Resurrection of the People by Ladislav Šaloun. Smetana Hall serves as a concert hall and ballroom. It has a glass dome. There is artwork by Alfons Mucha, Jan Preisler and Max Švabinský, too.

Today, the building is used as concert hall, ballroom, civic building, and as the location of cafes and restaurants. Many of the rooms in the building are closed to the public and open only for guided tours.

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Founded: 1905-1912
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Czech Republic

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bo Heylen (2 months ago)
Culture pure sang. One fine art nouveau building. The guided tour is really good. Worth the visit.
Jose Aponte (2 months ago)
Rich radiant tones. Acoustics were excellent Ivan Lins concert.
Axis (2 months ago)
Really beautiful atmosphere and great service. The food was truly delicious and worth the price, which was admittedly on the expensive side. I would recommend this, if you are looking for an experience while dining
Max (3 months ago)
Beautiful ambiente in the cafe, amazing Jugenstil designs everywhere. The food is great and, against expectations, not overly expensive
Lukáš Peták (4 months ago)
Amazing example of art nouveau architecture. Lovely interiors done with great level of traditional craftsmanship.
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