Český Krumlov Castle dates back to 1240 when the first castle was built by the Witigonen family, the main branch of the powerful Rosenberg family.

By the 17th century the Rosenbergs had died out and the dominion of Krumau was given to Hans Ulrich von Eggenberg by Emperor Ferdinand II and Eggenberg was named Duke of Krumau. After the death of Hans Ulrich's son, Johann Anton I von Eggenberg, the castle was administrated for the period between 1649 and 1664 by his widow Anna Maria.

One of her two sons, Johann Christian I von Eggenberg, was responsible for the Baroque renovations and expansions to the castle including the castle theatre now called the Eggenberg Theatre. When the male line of the Eggenbergs died out in 1717 the castle and duchy passed into the possession of the Schwarzenbergs. In 1947, the Schwarzenberg property, including Český Krumlov, was transferred to the Czech provincial properties and in 1950 it became the property of the Czechoslovak State. The entire area was declared a national monument in 1989 and in 1992 it was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List.

The castle houses the Český Krumlov Baroque Theatre, which is situated on the castle courtyard. It is one of the world's most completely preserved Baroque theatres with its original theatre building, auditorium, orchestra pit, stage, stage technology, machinery, coulisses (stage curtains), librettos, costumes etc.

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Founded: 1240
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pedro Celso (8 months ago)
Probably the most beautiful view I have ever seen. During the snow season this view makes you feel like you're living on fairy tale.
Kylie Fagan (9 months ago)
Beautiful castle and great views of the city! Have been twice and I find it very impressive.
Ivan Santiago Braga (10 months ago)
Very nice castle, with a great view of the town. Most attractions are closed over winter from what I could understand, so you can only enter the museum and the tower. The theater and other attractions are closed. You can enter the castle area for free.
ahmad farisy (10 months ago)
Tough fortress. Bold. Beautiful view from fortress to village. Feel middle ages era when walking on the village. Very nice
Awesome reviews and blogs (10 months ago)
The calmest town I've ever visited . Loved this place . You can get a great scene of the town from every single place in the town. State castle is huge and a nice photographic place to visit . Castle is on the river front and on high altitude, the view of the town is great
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