Hluboká Castle (Schloss Frauenberg) is considered one of the most beautiful castles in the Czech Republic. In the second half of the 13th century, a Gothic castle was built at the site. During its history, the castle was rebuilt several times. It was first expanded during the Renaissance period, then rebuilt into a Baroque castle at the order of Adam Franz von Schwarzenberg in the beginning of the 18th century. It reached its current appearance during the 19th century, when Johann Adolf II von Schwarzenberg ordered the reconstruction of the castle in the romantic style of England's Windsor Castle.

The Schwarzenbergs lived in Hluboká until the end of 1939, when the last owner (Adolph Schwarzenberg) emigrated overseas to escape from the Nazis. The Schwarzenbergs lost all of their Czech property through a special legislative Act, the Lex Schwarzenberg, in 1947.

The original royal castle of Přemysl Otakar II from the second half of the 13th century was rebuilt at the end of the 16th century by the Lords of Hradec. It received its present appearance under Count Jan Adam of Schwarzenberg. According to the English Windsor example, architects Franz Beer and F. Deworetzky built a Romantic Neo-Gothic chateau, surrounded by a 1.9 square kilometres English park here in the years 1841 to 1871. In 1940, the castle was seized from the last owner, Adolph Schwarzenberg by the Gestapo and confiscated by the government of Czechoslovakia after the end of World War II. The castle is open to public. There is a winter garden and riding-hall where the Southern Bohemian gallery exhibitions have been housed since 1956.

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Founded: 1840-1871
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Petr Kopač (9 months ago)
Beautiful castle, but the service is not friendly or engaging, I'd prefer an audio guide over this impersonal guide we had, who was not foreigner-friendly.
Chris Pena (9 months ago)
Beautiful space, awesome views, delicious food and drinks. Worth the trip!
nazneen shayara (9 months ago)
Good one but it was v difficult to climb
Fragrancy (11 months ago)
Beautiful castle. Tour number one is great to see a lot of the castle. Also English info available during the tour. I recommend taking the train from the main parking spot to the castle since it is vert steep uphill.
Michaela Pettersson (11 months ago)
This is a very pretty castle, definitely one of the nicest ones in Bohemia. We did the trip with a 5-year-old kid and he is too lively to last through a tour but even the gardens are worth your while. And if you do visit with kids, take them to the sport/relaxation area afterwards to compensate for the history/culture
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