Hluboká Castle (Schloss Frauenberg) is considered one of the most beautiful castles in the Czech Republic. In the second half of the 13th century, a Gothic castle was built at the site. During its history, the castle was rebuilt several times. It was first expanded during the Renaissance period, then rebuilt into a Baroque castle at the order of Adam Franz von Schwarzenberg in the beginning of the 18th century. It reached its current appearance during the 19th century, when Johann Adolf II von Schwarzenberg ordered the reconstruction of the castle in the romantic style of England's Windsor Castle.

The Schwarzenbergs lived in Hluboká until the end of 1939, when the last owner (Adolph Schwarzenberg) emigrated overseas to escape from the Nazis. The Schwarzenbergs lost all of their Czech property through a special legislative Act, the Lex Schwarzenberg, in 1947.

The original royal castle of Přemysl Otakar II from the second half of the 13th century was rebuilt at the end of the 16th century by the Lords of Hradec. It received its present appearance under Count Jan Adam of Schwarzenberg. According to the English Windsor example, architects Franz Beer and F. Deworetzky built a Romantic Neo-Gothic chateau, surrounded by a 1.9 square kilometres English park here in the years 1841 to 1871. In 1940, the castle was seized from the last owner, Adolph Schwarzenberg by the Gestapo and confiscated by the government of Czechoslovakia after the end of World War II. The castle is open to public. There is a winter garden and riding-hall where the Southern Bohemian gallery exhibitions have been housed since 1956.

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Founded: 1840-1871
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

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User Reviews

twu czupryna (18 months ago)
BEAUTIFUL!!!! It is a couple hours outside of Prague, but absolutely worth the commute! Such an amazing castle, just a heads up though, if you take the train to Hluboká it is a 50 minute walk to the castle, but it is worth it!
Ondřej Skála (18 months ago)
Hluboka is very beautiful "young" Chateau. It's very romantic place for a date
Yalcin Arik (19 months ago)
This palace seems larger from outside. The interior is smaller than it looks. One of the unique and the most beautiful castles in CZ. Somehow the exterior design reminds me the palace in Madrid.
Karl H (2 years ago)
Really beautiful place in Hluboka. You can spend a whole day there. What is also nice, is the architecture of the building. There are tours in the building, which are very interesting. The garden in front of the castle is perfect for taking pictures.
Marian Vass (2 years ago)
The chateau is unique for this part of the Europe as the last owners were inspired by English castles. Also interior has a lot to offer and guides are interesting. However, it's a pity that there are tours only in Czech in October. I was the only one who understood the guide from a group of about 10 visitors.
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