Château de Blandy-les-Tours

Blandy, France

The Château de Blandy-les-Tours was mentioned first time in 1216. It belonged to Adam II de Chailly, Viscount of Melun and consisted of a simple manor. The chapel was originally only stone building. In the 14th century, the castle was strongly modified with new fortifications: a moat was dug and a new gate-tower with a drawbridge was included in the enclosing wall. The kings Charles V (1364 - 1380) and Charles VI (1380 - 1422) financed the transformation into a castle for the successive owners of the castle, the counts de Tancarville Jean II and his grandson Guillaume IV. A high keep, defended by two drawbridges, was built. The curtain wall was modified by the addition of new towers. All these modifications took place during the Hundred Years' War.

However, the castle of Blandy-les-Tours was rebuilt in the 16th century by François II of Orleans. The castle consequently became a residence. The princess of Cleves married there in 1572 in the presence of the future Henry IV. But, the castle often changed owner and worsened gradually with various dwellings inside the enclosure.

After the 17th century restorations, the marshal de Villars, owner of the castle of Vaux-le-Vicomte, bought the land and the castle of Blandy. He decided to dismantle it and transformed it into a farm. The roofs were taken from the towers, the parapets were destroyed and the large gatehouse was dismantled.

In 1764, the castle was resold to the duke of Choiseul-Praslin, minister of Louis XV. In 1888, Pierre-Charles Tuot, the mayor of Blandy-les-Tours, bought it and gave it to the municipality, no building remains in the ruined enclosure. It became a Monument historique in 1889. In the 1970s, volunteer associations began the first works to restore the castle.

The keep of the castle is built as part of a hexagonal enclosure, around the castle chapel. It stands 35 m high inside a polygonal enclosure of 14th century round towers. In the courtyard are the remains of the Merovingian crypt. The castle of Blandy is a typical example of a 13th-century feudal fortress, later transformed into a great lordly residence in the style of the late 14th century. The enclosure holds 6 towers.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniel Shepherd (2 years ago)
Good castle, but only worth doing if you are in the local area. 90mins would be enough to see the entirety
Dominic Potter (3 years ago)
Love the place, nice to walk around the town and medieval castle. A classic.
Ju Do (3 years ago)
Cracking ancient castle from mediaeval times.not far from Paris. Walk along the ramparts. Climb the fortified towers. Really great interactive displays. Well worth the visit.
Cecilia Korol (3 years ago)
The castle is not furnished. But is a perfect example of a tyni medieval castle. Must have been impossible to heat.
David Burton (3 years ago)
Real mediaeval castle in the middle of a village. Car parking right outside. The castle has all the usual turrets, staircases etc which would not suit wheelchairs etc. One hall has been turned into two storey function facilities but the rest is original with plenty of explanation of the history. There is a gift shop and the location is convenient for Vaux le Vicomte and Fontainbleau, either of which are a complete contrast.
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