Meaux Cathedral

Meaux, France

Meaux Cathedral construction began between 1175-1180, when a structure in Romanesque style was started. Defects in the original design and construction had to be corrected in the 13th century, in which the architect Gautier de Vainfroy was much involved. He had to remove the previous cathedral almost totally and start a new structure in Gothic style. In the later 13th century work was often interrupted due to lack of funds, a problem removed by the generosity of Charles IV in the early 14th century. Further progress was interrupted by the Hundred Years' War and occupation by the English.

The archives of the diocese were destroyed in 1793 – 1794, thus deleting much knowledge about the early history of the church. The composer Pierre Moulu worked at the cathedral in the early 16th century.

The design of the cathedral, because of its construction period, encompasses several periods of Gothic art. The cathedral rises to a height of 48 meters; inside, the vaults at the choir rise to 33 meters. The interior ornamentation is noted for its smoothness, and the space for its overall luminosity. The cathedral contains a famous organ, built in the 17th century.

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Spottinghistory.com team said 2 months ago
Thank you, this is now fixed.

patgarreau@hotmail.com said 2 months ago
cette photo est une phot de la cathédrale de Clermont Frrand


Details

Founded: 1175-1180
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sandy Jarry (18 months ago)
Top
daisy AknCrdz (21 months ago)
Very impressive building worth a visit.
Antoine M (23 months ago)
This is one impressive and utterly beautiful cathedral in Meaux, east of Paris. This is Gothic style architecture at its most stupendous! The western façades, flanked by three magnificent portals is breathtaking (though there's currently some repair works happening when I visited, but not interrupt the overall presence). This cathedral replaced an earlier Romanesque style architecture that was too run-down and thus redone in its current Gothic style. Inside is just breathtaking with so many intricate features like the elevated liturgical choir of five vessels, central vessels and double collaterals (the aisles vessels of the nave)! There's a tower surmounting it in flamboyant style with utterly rich decorative transept. One other outstanding feature is the luminosity of the interior, breathtaking! Some well known tombs in this cathedral; of Jacques Bénigne Bossuet (refer to Dijon cathedral), Marie of France (Countess of Champagne, elder daughter of Louis VII of France and Eleanor of Aquitane), and Saint Fiacre of Breuil). There's so much to appreciate about this stunning cathedral both inside and outside which is also framed by a vast courtyard, a bishopric palace and a beautiful garden, Jardin Bossuet. Absolutely a must visit if you are visiting Meaux.
Rose doe (23 months ago)
Under construction at the moment but still pretty!
Sarah Pouzar (2 years ago)
It was so lovely, felt like a humble place but packed witb so much history and charm
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