Père Lachaise Cemetery

Paris, France

Père Lachaise Cemetery is the largest cemetery in Paris city. The cemetery takes its name from the confessor to Louis XIV, Père François de la Chaise (1624–1709), who lived in the Jesuit house rebuilt in 1682 on the site of the chapel. The property, situated on the hillside from which the king watched skirmishing between the Condé and Turenne during the Fronde, was bought by the city in 1804. Established by Napoleon in this year, the cemetery was laid out by Alexandre-Théodore Brongniart and later extended.

Père Lachaise Cemetery was opened on 21 May 1804. The first person buried there was a five-year-old girl named Adélaïde Paillard de Villeneuve, the daughter of a door bell-boy of the Faubourg St. Antoine. Her grave no longer exists as the plot was a temporary concession. Napoleon, who had been proclaimed Emperor by the Senate three days earlier, had declared during the Consulate that 'Every citizen has the right to be buried regardless of race or religion'.

At the time of its opening, the cemetery was considered to be situated too far from the city and attracted few funerals. Moreover, many Roman Catholics refused to have their graves in a place that had not been blessed by the Church. In 1804, the Père Lachaise had contained only 13 graves. Consequently, the administrators devised a marketing strategy and in 1804, with great fanfare, organised the transfer of the remains of Jean de La Fontaine and Molière. The following year there were 44 burials, with 49 in 1806, 62 in 1807 and 833 in 1812. Then, in another great spectacle in 1817, the purported remains of Pierre Abélard and Héloïse d'Argenteuil were also transferred to the cemetery with their monument's canopy made from fragments of the abbey of Nogent-sur-Seine.

This strategy achieved its desired effect: people began clamouring to be buried among the famous citizens. Records show that, within a few years, Père Lachaise went from containing a few dozen permanent residents to more than 33,000 in 1830. Père Lachaise was expanded five times: in 1824, 1829, 1832, 1842 and 1850. Although some sources incorrectly estimate the number of interred as 300,000 in Père Lachaise, according to official website of the city of Paris, one million people have been buried there. Along with the stored remains in the Aux Morts ossuary, the number of human remains exceeds 2–3 million.

The Communards' Wall (Mur des Fédérés) is also located in the cemetery. This is the site where 147 Communards, the last defenders of the workers' district of Belleville, were shot on 28 May 1871 – the last day of the 'Bloody Week' (Semaine Sanglante) in which the Paris Commune was crushed.

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Address

Chemin Berthollé, Paris, France
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Details

Founded: 1804
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in France

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jason Zimmerman (7 months ago)
It seems strange to review a cemetery, but it is worth the visit! Spend time honoring the wonderful lives that are in the cemetery. It is larger than you might think and the walkways are cobblestone. Prepare to be there for a while if you are wanting to see numerous sites.
Alexander Van Maele (8 months ago)
Beautiful graveyard with both big names and long forgotten tombs. Wonderful getaway from the city. Public toilets are available but be sure to bring your own paper and soap, as they are not always filled.
KelleyAnn Gallinagh (8 months ago)
So peaceful, you forget that you are in a major European city. Very different to cemeteries in Ireland. Interesting to see the different graves and tombs nestled amongst the greenery. Also nice to see some famous people's final resting places.
Jo (8 months ago)
Great place to get away from the buzz of the city! Calm atmosphere, it was interesting to walk along the graves that have been there for nearly 200 years. It was very fun to „run into“ some of my favourites artists, especially Jim Morrison, even though his grave is a little hidden behind a tree in second row. The cemetery also seems to be the meeting point for some locals, who were all very friendly! Great chance for a quick rest or just a nice walk.
Michelle M (10 months ago)
Historic cemetery in Paris with many famous graves including Jim Morrison, Oscar Wilde, Chopin, Marcel Proust. A very welcome green space with many birds. Many grand family crypts dating back to the 1700s. You could spend hours here but if you are more focussed in your visit them about an hour is probably enough. Free public toilets available near the gates in the middle part of the cemetery.
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