Château de Janvry

Janvry, France

The Château de Janvry dates back to the 17th century. It is still partially surrounded by watered moats. Its main building includes a primary wing facing west and two attached side wings, the north wing and the south wing. All wings are linked, creating a U-shaped château.

The château was built around 1600 and 1650 in the Louis XIII architectural style. It has been part of the Reille family for many centuries. The château has always been passted from generation to generation by the women of the family. Therefore, each succession brought a new last name as the estate’s owner. During the French Revolution of 1789, the château was robbed, resulting in the family losing all of its older documents regarding the château, its estate and history. Since the mid-19th century, the château has been used as a secondary residence by the family. The monument located at the village entrance was built following the death while giving birth in 1847 of Elisabeth Anjoran.

The Baron Jean Victor Reille inherited the domain during the Second World War. As the château had been unoccupied by the Reille family during the war, German, English and French troops were successfully lodged in the château. Local inhabitants witnessed the degradation of the property by some of the French troops, unlike the Germans or the English who took care of the estate. Some soldiers extracted wood panels from the original 17th-century hardwood floors to use as fuel for the master living room chimney during the harsh winter months. Today, traces of the new and replaced wooden panels can be seen in some parts of the formal living rooms. Also, in a bedroom on the second floor of the north-west tower, some inscriptions and writings on the walls can be found, witnessing the occupancy by French soldiers.

When Baron Jean Reille arrived to the château returning from the war, nettles were growing in some of the rooms of the house. Over the next few years following the end of the Second World, he and his wife Liliane successfully gave the château back its ancient splendor by installing a new roof, adding modern plumbing and electricity, also remodeling the interior of the house. His son, the Baron Ghislain Reille, pursued this laborious work when he took responsibility over the house in the 1980s. The château is now a modern property where many renovations have been made within the original style and charm of the Louis XIII-style chateau.

The main building follows a Louis XIII architectural style. Following this architecture trends, the château shows a very typical dissymmetry, unique to the Louis XIII style. The west side of the main building has four windows left to the main entrance, and three on the right side. Similarly, on the east side of the building (facing the private park), five windows can be found on the right of the entrance door and four on the left.

This courtyard is surrounded by barns and granaries forming a closed square where poultry, cattle and other farm animals used to be raised. All barns still have many traces of past activities. In one cowshed, some cows’ names can be seen. The stable is still functional and can house up to four horses. The attics above the barns are sumptuous with their vaulted ceilings and large oak beams from the local forests. One barn in particular has ceilings soaring 15–20 metres high. They were used to store cereals and grains. One of the barns leads to the south-western part of the tower, where four jail cells can still be found. In order to preserve its authenticity, no one has ever renovated these cells. Only a small and inaccessible fanlight gives air and light to the room. Two of the four jail doors are still present. It has been confirmed that these jail cells were being used during the Second World War for war prisoners.

The cellar runs under the entire west and north wings. The vaulted cellar has been used to store food and wine for many years. The cider and apple liquor produced in the château were stored there to mature.

The château is surrounded by a 14 hectare park. The park offers complete privacy and is surrounded by stone walls except for a small section wire netted. The park includes 10 hectares of forest with large alleys for leisurely strolls. There is more than two hectares of grassy area, half of which is mowed lawn. A one hectare lake and a tennis court are also located in the park. The park is accessible to modern vehicles through the small courtyard. There are also two portals located on the east and north walls.

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Details

Founded: 1600-1650
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Scott Shettig (10 months ago)
Beautiful chateau with amazing landscape! Spent the day shooting skeet as a pre wedding activity on their beautiful countryside. They have many different sites to shoot skeet in a very duck hunting style. Great for skilled and beginning shooters alike.
AURELIE BARRIER (12 months ago)
Very successful business seminar, lots of activities on offer at the château, excellent reception, and excellent food. Thank you to the whole team, we will keep fond memories of it
VEM (2 years ago)
Superb little Essonnian village. Beautiful walks possible. To have...
Noémie Ravoult (2 years ago)
We came with our team to relax outside paris and we were not disappointed! This is a family that interview this place for centuries is authentic and beautiful. The food is simple and very good (cooked prime rib in the fireplace). Congratulations to the organizers (Thanks Helen!) For our Kohlanta. Great to lay your head.
Catherine Duprez (2 years ago)
We came to Janvry, whom I knew through the Christmas market, and we were magnificently received by the owners of this chateau with great charm. We were very disoriented, it is a place where time seems to be stopped. The meal was excellent, and the theater is very pleasant to meet. The organization is very professional. The whole team said we would come back in the spring. Congratulations to you !
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