Křivoklát Castle was founded in the 12th century, belonging to the kings of Bohemia. During the reign of Přemysl Otakar II a large, monumental royal castle was built, later rebuilt by king Václav IV and later enlarged by king Vladislav of Jagellon.

The castle was damaged by fire several times. It was turned into a harsh prison and the building slowly deteriorated. During the 19th century, the family of Fürstenberg became the owners of the castle and had it reconstructed after a fire in 1826.

Today the castle serves as a museum, tourist destination and place for theatrical exhibitions. Collections of hunting weapons, Gothic paintings and books are stored there.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tomáš Florek (18 months ago)
Nice castle with a friendly tour guide. The surrounding area also provides a lot of opportunities for hiking. In the winter be prepared for quite chilly temperatures even inside since there is no heating.
Josef Kucera (18 months ago)
Really nice old castle with history with a shop with traditional Bohemian crystal and glass.
Thomas Zachar (2 years ago)
Nice castle situated in beautiful nature. Easily accessible by train from Prague.
Tereza Drvotova (2 years ago)
Very special and beautiful place. Although over past few years it has changed and I feel very tourist, Karlštejn-like approach. Still very worth to visit and enjoy!
Charles Seaton Jr. (2 years ago)
Definitely worth a day trip, The Křivoklát Castle is lovely place, There are tours inside and passes to allow access to roam along the walls and climb up the Towers top. There are restaurants, jewelry stores and archery station to test your accuracy. Plus outside of the castle grounds there are a few look out spots to view the glorious views of the castle.
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