Chotěšov Abbey is a former Premonstratensian nunnery founded between 1202 and 1210 by the Blessed Hroznata and settled by nuns from Doksany Abbey. The new foundation soon acquired wealth and influence, to the envy of the surrounding lordships and territories.

In 1421, during the Hussite Wars the nunnery was occupied and destroyed by a Hussite army under Jan Žižka. During the Thirty Years' War, in 1618, the nunnery was again occupied and plundered.

Between 1737 and 1756 the abbey was extensively rebuilt to Baroque designs by Jakub Auguston. On 21 January 1782 however it was dissolved under the rationalist reforms of the Emperor Joseph II. The lands and buildings were bought in 1822 by the Prince of Thurn und Taxis

In 1878 part of the premises were leased to the Order of the Visitation of Holy Mary, also known as the Visitandines or Salesian Sisters, for refugees of their Order from Moselweiss near Koblenz in Germany. They established a community and a girls' school here, which rapidly became well-known, particularly for the study of languages.

After World War I a group of sisters returned to Germany and set up a community in Marchtal Abbey. At the beginning of World War II the school was closed and instead the sisters took over the running of a home for elderly women which was established in part of the premises. All German sisters were obliged to leave the abbey and the country in 1945 after the end of World War II, leaving about 30 Czech sisters to run the home.

All occupants of the abbey were evicted in 1950, when the abbey was requisitioned as accommodation for the Czech army until 1975 when the army left, leaving an estimated 10 million crowns' worth of damage for which compensation has never been received. The buildings have stood empty ever since.

After some years under the control of government agencies, in 1991 ownership of the buildings was divided between the town of Chotěšov and the Visitandine nuns at Chlumec, whose share has since also passed to the town.

The abandoned buildings are in part in a state approaching the derelict and are threatened with collapse, despite their architectural and historical value and the great efforts of the local community to save them.

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Founded: 1202
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Milan Sladký (3 years ago)
Prohlídku je vhodné objednat předem. Areál je stále v rekonstrukci, části s průvodcem jsou přístupné.
Tomáš Bečka (4 years ago)
Spatne pac sem tam byl pracovat
Luboš Matuš (4 years ago)
Nádherné místo s kouzelnou atmosférou. Starý klášter, který byl v rukou armády, která se na něm bohužel smutně podepsala. V současnosti probíhá jeho obnova, no práce postupují pomalu.
Alexej Kokorev (4 years ago)
Místo, které má genius loci. Skvělá průvodkyně by mohla vyprávět o klášteře hodiny a pořád by to zajímavé. Moc děkujeme.
Petr Koldovský (4 years ago)
Klášter premonstrátek v Chotěšově byl založen v roce 1202-1210. Během doby došlo několikrát k jeho vyplenění a znovuobnovení. Po pádu Přemysla Otakara II. roku 1278 byl klášter spolu s kostelem vypleněn, vzápětí však došlo k opravě a kostel byl nově vysvěcen roku 1282. Výrazný rozkvět klášterní komunity spadá do doby vlády císaře Karla IV., kdy došlo k velké renovaci konventu. Vzrostlo i majetkové držení kláštera, z někdejších asi 30 vesnic na 56 a tři města. Budova konventu je dílem Jakuba Augustona ve stylu vrcholného baroka. K největší devastaci kláštera došlo po roce 1950, kdy ho měla v užívání armáda. V současnosti se pracuje na jeho opravách.
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