The original Gothic castle of Grabštejn (or Grafenstein) was founded in the 13th century. In 1562, it was bought by Crown Chancellor Georg Mehl von Strelitz. Between 1566 and 1586, he had rebuilt the castle in Renaissance style and thus turned it into a representative chateau.

Georg Mehl also had a steward's house built below the castle, which was around the year 1830 rebuilt in Classicist style. Shortly before that – around 1818 – Christian of Clam-Gallas had built the New Castle near the Old Castle. The new building was surrounded by a large garden with a number of valuable plants. The Old Castle has preserved its original Renaissance appearance despite a fire which damaged its upper floors in 1843.

The House of Clam-Gallas owned Grabštejn since 1704 until it was confiscated in 1945. After the Second World War, the castle was open to the public, but in 1953, the whole castle complex was taken over by the Ministry of Defence. The Old Castle's condition significantly deteriorated after the army left in the late 1980s.

Repairs and restorations began in 1989. Nowadays, Grabštejn is one of the best restored monuments of great importance in the Czech Republic. The castle was opened to the public again in 1993. The tower offers a marvellous view of the three-border-triangle, the castle's northern wing, and the vault. The most touristically attractive part of the castle interior is the St. Barbara chapel decorated with Renaissance fresco paintings from the 16th century. All parts of the ceiling and walls are ornamented in with interlaced figural, animal, and heraldic motifs.

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Founded: 13th century/1566
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Monika Kratěnová (2 years ago)
Super
Inka XOXO (2 years ago)
Beautiful landscape, deep history, culture impression, still in step by step reconstruction, chapel mysteriously saved in wild history. Castle complex from 13th century. For many people even czech this castle is reappeared due to long close. Many architect tried to do the best in the last 20 years to safe this unigue pearl. Just only forest path to the gate. If you want to get there with disabled people/pram, you can call in advance to Grabstejn office to get through 100m near military better way.
Jana Mulacova (2 years ago)
Amazing experience!
Robert Luckhurst (2 years ago)
A nice visit, maybe would recommend joining the two tours as the cellars were rather short.
Elliot Jalley (4 years ago)
Very glad we visited! If you don't want to go on a tour you can still go up the tower for 30kc.
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