Bautzen Cathedral

Bautzen, Germany

St. Peter's Cathedral is an interdenominational church in Bautzen. It is among the oldest and largest simultaneum churches in Germany. The first church was built around the 1000 AD. Near the beginning of the 13th century, a cathedral was built under the supervision of Bishop Bruno II.

Between 1456 and 1463, the cathedral that now stands was constructed and named after St. Peter. A fourth nave was added to the original structure. A fire decimated much of the city and church in 1634, and the church required a new vault and significant restoration work. The entire interior of the church, with the exception of the original Gothic-style which can still be seen today.

The church is a mixture of several different architectural styles, the most prominent being Gothic and Baroque. The early church was entirely a Gothic structure, but it has since been heavily modified. Today, only parts of the interior are Gothic in nature. The Baroque dome was added to the tower in 1664.

Today, Catholic and Lutheran altars are located on separate sides of the sanctuary. The Catholic high-altar was built in 1723. It was designed by a student of Balthasar Permoser, the same man that designed the Zwinger in Dresden. The altar murals were painted by the Venetian painter Pellegrini.

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Details

Founded: 1456-1463
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tamaya (3 months ago)
Die Aussicht vom Turm war wirklich wundervoll. Über 200 Stufen muss man überwinden um bis nach oben zu gelangen. 2 Euro kostet es um das Wunder des Baus von innen zu besichtigen und um die Aussicht genießen zu können. Vorsicht allerdings für Ältere, es gibt steile Treppen im letzten Teil.
Ivo Scholze (3 months ago)
Ein wunderschöner Dom. In seiner Art fast einzigartig. Wenn man die Zeit hat und die Stufen nicht scheut, sollte man auf jedenfalls den Turm hinauf steigen und die tolle Aussicht über Bautzen und der Oberlausitz genießen.
Bart Wallet (11 months ago)
A rare simultan church full of tiny intersting historical details.
Wojciech Hubert Agaciak (3 years ago)
One of the most interesting simultaneous temple Eropy . After revitalization beautifully presented . Interesting architecture emphasize drewnniane elemanty and two sets of church organ.
Long Talker (4 years ago)
Wonderful from the outside, was being renovated inside when we visited (july 2015) but we could still climb the tower, which was an awesome experience, great views
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