The Mělník castle belongs to the most important sights of this town. Since Princess Ludmila, the grandmother of the Good King Wenceslas, who was born in Mělník, the castle has been the residence of the queen widows of Bohemia. Under Emperor Charles IV, Mělník became a royal town. His last wife built the chapel of the castle with its gothic vaults.

The last queen who resided in Mělník, was the wife of king Jiri of Podebrady during the 15th century. In the following years, the estate of Mělník became the property of different noble families. In 1542 the castle was reconstructed in renaissance style and the two arcades, richly decorated with sgrafitto patterning, have been added. 

During the Thirty Years War, 1618-1648, the castle was abandoned. In the year 1646 Count Czernin started a major reconstruction and had the early barrock southern wing added. The Count purchased the Mělník Estate from the Emperor Ferdinand II. The heiress of the Czernin family, Countess Ludmila Czernin, married Prince August Anton Lobkowicz in 1753. With the exception of the Second World War and the 41 years of communist rule, Mělník Castle remained in the Lobkowicz family.

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Founded: 1542
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

jaewan Sung (10 months ago)
Place where two water streams, Vltava and Elbe, meet. Lovely place for running and cycling
Dušan Lipár (11 months ago)
Nice place.
ryne mathena (2 years ago)
A pretty interesting castle(?) to walk through if you happen to be in the area. The hand drawn map room from all the major european cities was amazing! I wish I had taken more pictures or could find copies.
Jana Rolenc (2 years ago)
Nice Castle with beautiful view. A lot of bike ways around.
Pedro Heitor (2 years ago)
Cool place, adjacent restaurant has an amazing view :)
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