The Mělník castle belongs to the most important sights of this town. Since Princess Ludmila, the grandmother of the Good King Wenceslas, who was born in Mělník, the castle has been the residence of the queen widows of Bohemia. Under Emperor Charles IV, Mělník became a royal town. His last wife built the chapel of the castle with its gothic vaults.

The last queen who resided in Mělník, was the wife of king Jiri of Podebrady during the 15th century. In the following years, the estate of Mělník became the property of different noble families. In 1542 the castle was reconstructed in renaissance style and the two arcades, richly decorated with sgrafitto patterning, have been added. 

During the Thirty Years War, 1618-1648, the castle was abandoned. In the year 1646 Count Czernin started a major reconstruction and had the early barrock southern wing added. The Count purchased the Mělník Estate from the Emperor Ferdinand II. The heiress of the Czernin family, Countess Ludmila Czernin, married Prince August Anton Lobkowicz in 1753. With the exception of the Second World War and the 41 years of communist rule, Mělník Castle remained in the Lobkowicz family.

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Founded: 1542
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ágnes Csatáry (5 months ago)
We were only circling around, but there is a nice view. The area is nice for an evening walk
Saumya Sharma (7 months ago)
Brilliant lunch! Mesmerising views!
Janet Swift (14 months ago)
Wonderful Chateau and winery. Watched the crush, enjoyed a glass of wine on the terrace overlooking the confluence of the rivers!
Uri Zaretsky (15 months ago)
Very interesting tour inside the castle. The cellular is impressive.
Petr Chocholouš (20 months ago)
Nice historic site on top of two major czech rivers.
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