Judgement Tower

Maribor, Slovenia

The Judgement Tower is a fortified medieval tower in Maribor. An original tower built on the site in the early 14th century secured the southwestern corner of the city walls. It was completely rebuilt in 1540, with the addition of a conical roof which burned down in the 17th century.

The tower has seen several additions; the renaissance structure extends to the tops of the second-floor windows, and is followed an early 17th century extension. Four more floors were added in the 19th century.

The tower partially burned down again in 1937 and was restored in the 1950s. It is one of several surviving elements of the former city walls; others include the Water Tower and the Jewish Tower, while the Benetke Tower was demolished in the late 1960s to make way for a hydroelectric reservoir.

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Address

Pristan 8, Maribor, Slovenia
See all sites in Maribor

Details

Founded: 1540
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovenia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

IOAN M. (4 years ago)
Great fortress.
Anon ymous (5 years ago)
AAA- to BBB-... Very Different Service, IT depends on the Day u Visit...
Willem Rooze (5 years ago)
I love this place especially for it's atmosphere. Visited the venture for a concert and liked the acoustic. Highly recommend this place
Jan Oxi (5 years ago)
Good
Amartya Ghosh (5 years ago)
Maribor in Slovenia isn't that popular place yet this one's a quiant and quiet place. Nice to stroll around. Good for a day trip out from the city hustle.
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