Cathedrals in Slovenia

Ljubljana Cathedral

Ljubljana Cathedral, also named St. Nicholas" Cathedral, was originally a Gothic church. In the early 18th century, it was replaced by a Baroque building. It is an easily recognizable landmark of the city with its green dome and twin towers and stands at Cyril and Methodius Square by the nearby Ljubljana Central Market and Town Hall. The site was originally occupied by an aisled three-nave Romanesque church, the old ...
Founded: 1701-1707 | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

St. George's Cathedral

Above the compact Piran town centre reigns St. George"s Cathedral, which gives the city its special character. It was probably built in the 12th century, but no exact data in this regard exists. In the 14th century, it was built to its present size. In the year 1344, on the Day of St. George, the cathedral was consecrated by nine bishops from near and far. It acquired its present appearance after Baroque renovation ...
Founded: 1344 | Location: Piran, Slovenia

Koper Cathedral

The three-nave Romanesque Koper Cathedral with three apses was built in the second half of the 12th century. The Romanesque construction is preserved on the south side, where typical funnel-shape windows are intact and the stonework is imitated in the facade. Towards the west the church was extended to the bell tower and in 1392 it was Gothicized. The lower floor facade by the square has remained Gothic. The upper floor w ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Koper, Slovenia

Maribor Cathedral

First built in 1248 as a Romanesque basilica with a nave and two aisles, the cathedral gained its current appearance in the 15th century as a Gothic structure, though the Baroque chapels date from the 16th and 18th centuries. Inside, one is treated to the sight of a lavishly adorned altar, which lights up the place all on its own. The 57 metre high classicist designed bell tower dates back to the end of the 18th century ...
Founded: 1248 | Location: Maribor, Slovenia

Basilica of Our Mother of Mercy

Originally a monastery dating from the 12th century, the red-bricked cathedral dedicated to St Mary Mother of Mercy was built in its place with a two-towered, three nave basilica between 1892 and 1900, according to a design by Viennese architect Richard Jordan. However, the old monastery was constructed in rather more heroic circumstances with local woman carrying the bricks for its construction all the way from nearby Me ...
Founded: 1892-1900 | Location: Maribor, Slovenia

Celje Cathedral

Celje Cathedral is dedicated to the Prophet Daniel. As early as the 12th century there was a small basilica on the site. This was replaced in 1306 by the present building, which served as the church of the abbey which during the Middle Ages stood on the edge of the town. In 1379 the rib vaulted roof was created. The church was altered several times up to the 16th century. In 1413 the Gothic chapel of the Mater Dolorosa wa ...
Founded: 1306 | Location: Celje, Slovenia

Novo Mesto Cathedral

Novo Mesto Cathedral is located on a hill above the Krka River. It is distinguished by a combination of Gothic and Baroque architecture and a broken longitudinal axis, because the presbytery is higher than the nave. The original church was first mentioned in 1428, although it was standing already before. The three-pole presbytery with its quintuple axis ending has been preserved from the time. In 1493, when the chapter w ...
Founded: 1493 | Location: Novo mesto, Slovenia

Murska Sobota Cathedral

Murska Sobota Cathedral site was originally occupied by Roman temples. The first church here was built of wood from 1071, shortly after the Hungarians who had settled here converted to Christianity. Murska Sobota developed into a religious centre during the Middle Ages. The medieval second cathedral of 1350 was replaced in 1912 by the present Neo-Romanesque building, which includes some decorative elements of the Jugends ...
Founded: 1912 | Location: Murska Sobota, Slovenia

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Externsteine Stones

The Externsteine (Extern stones) is a distinctive sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest, near the town of Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation is a tor consisting of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. Archaeological excavations have yielded some Upper Paleolithic stone tools dating to about 10,700 BC from 9,600 BC.

In a popular tradition going back to an idea proposed to Hermann Hamelmann in 1564, the Externsteine are identified as a sacred site of the pagan Saxons, and the location of the Irminsul (sacral pillar-like object in German paganism) idol reportedly destroyed by Charlemagne; there is however no archaeological evidence that would confirm the site's use during the relevant period.

The stones were used as the site of a hermitage in the Middle Ages, and by at least the high medieval period were the site of a Christian chapel. The Externsteine relief is a medieval depiction of the Descent from the Cross. It remains controversial whether the site was already used for Christian worship in the 8th to early 10th centuries.

The Externsteine gained prominence when Völkisch and nationalistic scholars took an interest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This interest peaked under the Nazi regime, when the Externsteine became a focus of nazi propaganda. Today, they remain a popular tourist destination and also continue to attract Neo-Pagans and Neo-Nazis.