Celje Cathedral

Celje, Slovenia

Celje Cathedral is dedicated to the Prophet Daniel. As early as the 12th century there was a small basilica on the site. This was replaced in 1306 by the present building, which served as the church of the abbey which during the Middle Ages stood on the edge of the town. In 1379 the rib vaulted roof was created. The church was altered several times up to the 16th century. In 1413 the Gothic chapel of the Mater Dolorosa was added, which was dedicated in 1420 by the bishop of Freising, Hermann von Cilli. Here is located a carved wooden Pietà, which is the main treasure of the church.

The three-aisled nave has a flat roof and a separate space for the segregated use of nuns. The ceilings are decorated with frescoes of the 15th century, but those of the choir are older than those of the nave: the fragment of the figure of Christ in the middle of the choir ceiling may even date from the 14th century. Other frescoes depict the Three Kings.

During the Baroque period a brightly-decorated chapel of Saint Francis Xavier was added.

The painting of the chancel is by Michael Rosenberger, an artist who restored it in 1851. In 1858 the church was given its present Gothic Revival appearance. Various gravestones from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (up to the 17th century) decorate the inside and outside walls.

The 39th bishop of Freising, Hermann von Cilli, who died in Celje on 13 December 1421 after an operation, was buried in the church. His monument is now in the presbytery on the Gospel side.

After the reform of the liturgy the windows of the chapel of the Mother of God were replaced by colourful modern windows.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1306
Category: Religious sites in Slovenia

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Metka Krajnc (21 months ago)
V božičnem času je sploh čarobna.
Riccardo Zanini (2 years ago)
Chiesa romanica, inizialmente ad un'unica navata a cui vennero aggiunte due torri e arricchita con elementi gotici.
Rita G (2 years ago)
L'antica chiesa è situata in pieno centro del paese. Originariamente di stile Romanico ad una unica navata è stata ricostruita più volte nei secoli e conserva elementi gotici di rilievo e in particolare la Cappella della Madonna Addolorata in stile gotico classico del 1413. Molto bello il presepio natalizio
Attila Tényi (2 years ago)
Szép gótikus templom.
Jože Avbelj (2 years ago)
Velika ntranjost
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Luxembourg Palace

The famous Italian Medici family have given two queens to France: Catherine, the spouse of Henry II, and Marie, widow of Henry IV, who built the current Luxembourg palace. Maria di Medici had never been happy at the Louvre, still semi-medieval, where the fickle king, did not hesitate to receive his mistresses. The death of Henry IV, assassinated in 1610, left the way open for Marie's project. When she became regent, she was able to give special attention to the construction of an imposing modern residence that would be reminiscent of the Palazzo Pitti and the Boboli Gardens in Florence, where she grew up. The development of the 25-hectare park, which was to serve as a jewel-case for the palace, began immediately.

The architect, Salomon de Brosse, began the work in 1615. Only 16 years later was the palace was completed. Palace of Luxembourg affords a transition between the Renaissance and the Classical period.

In 1750, the Director of the King's Buildings installed in the wing the first public art-gallery in France, in which French and foreign canvases of the royal collections are shown. The Count of Provence and future Louis XVIII, who was living in Petit Luxembourg, had this gallery closed in 1780: leaving to emigrate, he fled from the palace in June 1791.

During the French Revolution the palace was first abandoned and then moved as a national prison. After that it was the seat of the French Directory, and in 1799, the home of the Sénat conservateur and the first residence of Napoleon Bonaparte, as First Consul of the French Republic. The old apartments of Maria di Medici were altered. The floor, which the 80 senators only occupied in 1804, was built in the middle of the present Conference Hall.

Beginning in 1835 the architect Alphonse de Gisors added a new garden wing parallel to the old corps de logis, replicating the look of the original 17th-century facade so precisely that it is difficult to distinguish at first glance the old from the new. The new senate chamber was located in what would have been the courtyard area in-between.

The new wing included a library (bibliothèque) with a cycle of paintings (1845–1847) by Eugène Delacroix. In the 1850s, at the request of Emperor Napoleon III, Gisors created the highly decorated Salle des Conférences, which influenced the nature of subsequent official interiors of the Second Empire, including those of the Palais Garnier.

During the German occupation of Paris (1940–1944), Hermann Göring took over the palace as the headquarters of the Luftwaffe in France, taking for himself a sumptuous suite of rooms to accommodate his visits to the French capital. Since 1958 the Luxembourg palace has been the seat of the French Senate of the Fifth Republic.