Celje Cathedral

Celje, Slovenia

Celje Cathedral is dedicated to the Prophet Daniel. As early as the 12th century there was a small basilica on the site. This was replaced in 1306 by the present building, which served as the church of the abbey which during the Middle Ages stood on the edge of the town. In 1379 the rib vaulted roof was created. The church was altered several times up to the 16th century. In 1413 the Gothic chapel of the Mater Dolorosa was added, which was dedicated in 1420 by the bishop of Freising, Hermann von Cilli. Here is located a carved wooden Pietà, which is the main treasure of the church.

The three-aisled nave has a flat roof and a separate space for the segregated use of nuns. The ceilings are decorated with frescoes of the 15th century, but those of the choir are older than those of the nave: the fragment of the figure of Christ in the middle of the choir ceiling may even date from the 14th century. Other frescoes depict the Three Kings.

During the Baroque period a brightly-decorated chapel of Saint Francis Xavier was added.

The painting of the chancel is by Michael Rosenberger, an artist who restored it in 1851. In 1858 the church was given its present Gothic Revival appearance. Various gravestones from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (up to the 17th century) decorate the inside and outside walls.

The 39th bishop of Freising, Hermann von Cilli, who died in Celje on 13 December 1421 after an operation, was buried in the church. His monument is now in the presbytery on the Gospel side.

After the reform of the liturgy the windows of the chapel of the Mother of God were replaced by colourful modern windows.

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Details

Founded: 1306
Category: Religious sites in Slovenia

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Metka Krajnc (14 months ago)
V božičnem času je sploh čarobna.
Riccardo Zanini (2 years ago)
Chiesa romanica, inizialmente ad un'unica navata a cui vennero aggiunte due torri e arricchita con elementi gotici.
Rita G (2 years ago)
L'antica chiesa è situata in pieno centro del paese. Originariamente di stile Romanico ad una unica navata è stata ricostruita più volte nei secoli e conserva elementi gotici di rilievo e in particolare la Cappella della Madonna Addolorata in stile gotico classico del 1413. Molto bello il presepio natalizio
Attila Tényi (2 years ago)
Szép gótikus templom.
Jože Avbelj (2 years ago)
Velika ntranjost
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