The Marton Museum is Croatia's first private museum (established in 2003) and specializes in 18th and 19th century European applied art. The Marton Museum derives its name from its original founder, Mr Veljko Marton, whose collection is featured within its walls.

The museum's collection counts a number of silver and glass pieces, along with various paintings and furniture pieces, yet it perhaps bears mention that the museum is particularly known for its European porcelain. The Marton Collection features pieces from many well known and historic manufacturers including Meissen and Sèvres, among others. Vienna porcelain is particularly well represented, with numerous pieces ranging from the early Du Paquier period to the later Sorgenthal period. The depth of the collection in this area is such that one can easily trace the evolution of tastes and decorative styles of the aristocracy who bought these pieces over the decades, from early Chinese influenced floral patterns to later painted depictions of European landscapes and gilded neoclassical motifs.

Many of the porcelain pieces enjoy a royal provenance and are directly related to the European regency who could afford these luxuries at the time. For example, among the many pieces of historic Russian porcelain contained within the collection, there exist plates that were commissioned by Catherine the Great for both the St. Alexander Nevsky and St. Vladimir Order service, another plate that was made for the wedding of Duke Constantin Nikolayevich (son of Tsar Nicholas I), as well a glass cooler that was made for the Grand Duchess of Catherine Pavlova as part of her dowry for her marriage to Prince Peter Friedrich Georg Oldenburg, among others.

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Founded: 2003
Category: Museums in Croatia

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