King Charles' Church

Kungsör, Sweden

Karl (Charles) XI is perhaps the Swedish king that most enjoyed spending time in Kungsör and he had this church built for the Royal Manor. It took from 1690 to 1700 to build the church but unfortunately the king never saw it when it was finished. He died in 1697 when a lot of work remained to be done on the interior. To mark the bicentennial of his death, a large gilded copper crown was mounted on the church dome in 1897.

The church was designed by Nicodemus Tessin, the Younger, and the altarpiece and silver collection were designed by Burchardt and David Klöcker Ehrenstral. The church was opened in the year 1700 and is an original Baroque church characterized by a number of King Karl XI’s personal touches. The pulpit is from the Tre Kronor palace chapel.

For guided tours of the church, please contact the parish registrar’s office.

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Details

Founded: 1690-1700
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

More Information

www.kungsor.se

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eric Svensson (3 years ago)
Eric Svensson (3 years ago)
Sanaz Azimi (3 years ago)
Sanaz Azimi (3 years ago)
hallå hej (3 years ago)
Fin kyrka med bra park nära 10/10
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