Arboga Town Hall

Arboga, Sweden

The town hall was originally built as a church in the 15th Century. During the reformation in the 16th Century Gustav Vasa gave the church to the people of Arboga and its new purpose was to be the town hall. However the king used the house as his own private residence instead. His daughter, Cecilia, Countess of Arboga, also lived here in 1570. From 1640 to the present day Arboga’s town council has had offices here. The present appearance dates from the renovation made in 1725-1759.

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Address

Smedjegatan 5, Arboga, Sweden
See all sites in Arboga

Details

Founded: 1752-59
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

More Information

wikitravel.org
www.arboga.se

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Assmaa Goukhadar (2 years ago)
En bra vollybollhall för ungdomar
Maya Yama (2 years ago)
Platsen är bra. På nedre våningen så kan man träna innebandy, fotboll, handboll och mer. På ovanbåningen så finns det en brottningsmatta så att man kan träna brottning, gymnastik och akrobatik där. Dessutom så finns det ett gym slm är gratis på övervåningen. Det finns maskiner, armgång, tjockmatta, hopprep, bulgarian bags, madicinbollar, roddmaskin, stakmaskin, bänkpress, vikter, latsdrag m.m.
Halo Osman (2 years ago)
Helo
Makaila van Schalkwyk (2 years ago)
Good place to find all sorts of teams to join. I am on the floorball/ innebandey team and the badminton team but there are many more.
Mohammed Habosh (2 years ago)
Jag tycker de fint sal
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