Eskilstuna's history dates back to medieval times when English monk Saint Eskil made "Tuna" his base and diocese of the South coast of Lake Mälaren. Saint Eskil was stoned to death by the pagan vikings of neighbouring town Strängnäs, trying to convert them to Christianity. Saint Eskil was buried in his monastery church in Tuna. Later the pagan city of Strängnäs was Christianised and was given the privilege of becoming diocese of South Lake Mälaren.

Later "Eskil" was added in to the word "Tuna". However, the town of Eskilstuna did not receive municipal privileges due to its proximity to the medieval city of Torshälla. The monastery of Saint Eskil was completely destroyed by Swedish king Gustav Vasa during the Protestant Reformation.

The present Kloster Kyrka, a monastery church, was built according to plans by architect Otar Hökerberg . It was opened May 29, 1929. Above the main entrance is a sculpture depicting Saint Eskil. The entrance door to the church is surrounded by paintings of the apostles Paul and Peter. The old altar is high and wide staircases of stone leading up from the nave. The altarpiece from the 1600s is the work of the Flemish master Martin de Vos and represents the shepherds' adoration.

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Details

Founded: 1929
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

TS Jo (3 years ago)
Very beautiful church! But can someone please tell me why the name of this church is in Arabic, is the church turning into Mosque soon???!!!
Miral Touma (4 years ago)
Really amazing
Matúš Oboňa (4 years ago)
Beautiful church.
Анастасия Булахова (5 years ago)
Really beautiful place inside and outside. Really nice people
Mohamd Kawder (7 years ago)
That is good
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