Arboga Museum

Arboga, Sweden

In 1846 the merchant Anders Öhrström built a lavish residence for himself and his family – The Öhrström estate (Öhrströms gård) on Nygatan has been meticulously renovated and its period rooms and features are a true asset to Arboga. The estate is now home to Arboga Museum.

The museum also houses a large photographic archive and library in addition to modern facilities for exhibitions and other events. An additional feature of the museum is the collections of silver, tin and alder root on display, all made by famous Arboga craftsmen.

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Address

Nygatan 37, Arboga, Sweden
See all sites in Arboga

Details

Founded: 1846
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vasya Sm (2 years ago)
Кайф
fabian otterskog (2 years ago)
Arboga museum is an old wholesaler mansion from the 19th century. They also have a temporary exhibition that changes now and then. In the summers you can come see a dramatised guiding of the museum.
Fredrik Sidmar (2 years ago)
Wilgot Erikson (2 years ago)
Annette Johansson (3 years ago)
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