Loupian Roman villa

Loupian, France

Excavations on a three-hectare site south of the Loupian village have revealed remains of a Roman farm villa with extensive 2nd-century Gallo-Roman mosaics. The site was occupied for more than 600 years.

Originally a modest farmstead built a few kilometres south of the Via Domitia, on the hillside overlooking the Bassin de Thau, it rapidly prospered and grew. During the early Empire, in the 1st and 2nd centuries, the villa was a large patrician residence with thermal springs. The main agricultural activity was viticulture, for which a storehouse capable of holding 1,500 hl of wine was constructed. This period also saw the building of a small port on the northern shore of the Bassin de Thau, as well as pottery workshops producing amphorae for the transportation of wine.

In the 5th century, the villa was completely rebuilt and the owner's home turned into a small mansion. The thirteen ground floor rooms are covered in multicoloured, highly decorated mosaics. The potteries by now were producing not just amphorae but also household pottery.

The springs from the original house were decorated with 2nd-century mosaics. However, those in the later villa are unique inasmuch as there is no other villa in which the influences of two such geographically separated countries, Aquitaine and Syria, have come together. This oddity is perhaps explained by the eclectic taste of the owner, or possibly simply from a desire to have the work completed quickly. In theory, a team of four mosaic workers would take a whole year to cover a 500 m2 floor. At Loupian, two teams working together could have laid the original 450 m2 in between six and eighteen months.

A 1000 m2 building protects the remains of the villa and its mosaics. Guided tours of the site and its museum are available, in French, every day in summer and on Wednesdays and weekends outside the season (closed in January). Tours in English are available at certain times.

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Address

D158E4, Loupian, France
See all sites in Loupian

Details

Founded: 0-100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Julien Saint-Lanne (2 years ago)
Site très intéressant avec un personnel avenant. Les mosaïques sont magnifiques. À voir
Pär Håkan Bergström (3 years ago)
Not to be missed! Intersting restored mosaiques from an old roman villa.
Séan Donnellan (4 years ago)
Arrived too late to get in. Returning soon! 2nd attempt - also closed (Tuesdays in June) Next year maybe!
Kleiner Indianer (4 years ago)
Nice place
Stephan Claes (5 years ago)
Very interesting site. The guides do a good job of explaining the mosaics, the technologies used. on the other hand they present you a clear view on Roman society and it's inner workings.
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