The Musée Fabre was founded by François-Xavier Fabre, a Montpellier painter, in 1825. It is one of the main sights of Montpellier. The town of Montpellier was given thirty paintings in 1802 which formed the basis of a modest municipal museum under the Empire, moving between various temporary sites. In 1825, the town council accepted a large donation of works from Fabre and the museum was installed in the refurbished Hôtel de Massillian, officially opened on 3 December 1828. Fabre's generosity led others to follow his example, notably Antoine Valedau who donated his collection of Dutch and Flemish masters to the city. On the death of Fabre in 1837, a legacy of more than a hundred pictures and drawings completed the collection.

In 1864, Jules Bonnet-Mel, an art collector from Pézenas, bequeathed 400 drawings and 28 paintings. In 1868, Alfred Bruyas offered the works from his private gallery to the city. He is credited with having moved the museum collection into the modern era. In 1870, Jules Canonge, from Nîmes, gave a collection of more than 350 drawings. A legacy of Bruyas of more than 200 works completed his gift in 1877.

In 1968, Mme Sabatier d'Espeyran in accordance with the will of her husband, a diplomat and great bibliophile, gave to the city their hôtel particulier, built under the Third Republic along with its contents.

Around 2001, the Library moved out of the complex, freeing a sizeable area and offering the chance to carry out a major modernisation and enhancement of the building. This took four years and included a whole new wing. The building re-opened in 2007.

On display are ceramics from Greece and the rest of Europe. Furthermore, the museum has a large collection of paintings from the 17th until the 19th century, with a large representation of the luminophiles movement. There is also sculptures.

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Founded: 1825
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thibaud Fournier (4 months ago)
Always free on Sundays, this museum has paintings from the middle age and Renaissance as well as more modern pieces. There's also expositions from living artists which are changing every 6 months.
Bill yaglis (8 months ago)
As overall description of the I could mention that is one the very important museums of France. The paintings exposure is focussing mainly in the classicism the baroque and neoclassicism period. In addition should be mentuoned that the whole place is friendly to visitors and gives the chance for relaxation and consideration.
Fredrik (8 months ago)
Was let inside 1 hour before closing without any information that I'd actually had to run through the exhibition in order to get through it in one hour (it turned out to be a huge exhibition). There were 10 people in the exhibition when everybody were rushed out (literally like kettle). It would have cost the museum nothing to issue complementary next day tickets or a refund on the ground that "the product" was not delivered, but the woman in the counter showed no understanding. I recommend the exhibition (though I can only speak for the part I had time to see), but make sure you go early.
A H (10 months ago)
Great display space for visiting exhibitions. Picasso currently - very interesting and well laid out. Excellent cafe/restaurant just outside in the shade and away from the mayhem that is Montpellier! Highly recommended!
Hilary Walker (11 months ago)
Enjoyed Picasso exhibition. Each period has a clear explanation of Picasso's evolution Excellent English. Makes you want to learn even more. Museum wonderfully air conditioned. Could go back several times
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