The Château des Guilhem was built for the Guilhems, lords of Clermont-l’Hérault, at the end of the 11th and beginning of the 12th centuries. The castle stands on Puech Castel hill, overlooking the town and surrounding country. The strategic site permitted control of the Hérault valley and the road to Bédarieux and the higher cantons, as well as the feudal town which was itself fortified soon after the castle was built. There is some evidence that earlier buildings existed.

After a number of troubled periods when the castle provided shelter for the local population, it was slowly abandoned from the 16th century. Owing to its largely abandoned state, it escaped the widespread destruction of castles by Cardinal Richelieu. However, its abandonment and the ravages of time have caused serious deterioration: the only remnants are the fortifications, two vaulted halls and the Guilhem Tower (tour Guilhem) which still stands above the town.

The castle site is open daily to visitors, though access to the tower is not possible.

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Details

Founded: c. 1100
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Myriam Djouama (20 months ago)
Un lieu privilégié de nature avec une belle vue panoramique à proximité de la ville. Tranquillité pour une journée au calme ou entre amis pour s'amuser en plein air; autant au soleil qu à l'ombre des arbres. Château en ruine mais attractif, enfants à surveiller cependant.
Chantal Caro (20 months ago)
Joli endroit à découvrir .. Une rénovation devrait être envisagée ...
Chloe Delporte (22 months ago)
Château à l'abandon c'est dommage que Clermont le laisse se détériorer
nelly gineste (22 months ago)
Dommage que ce soit pas mis en valeurs
Thibault Noll (3 years ago)
Great view of the town and very Well kept!
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