Pont du Diable

Céret, France

The Pont du Diable (Devil's bridge) is a medieval stone arch bridge at Céret, built between 1321 and 1341. It spans the river Tech with a single arch of 45,5 metres.

According a legend, the locals wanted a bridge to be built across the river and called upon the devil to build it for them. The devil agreed on the condition that he would claim the first soul to cross the bridge. Once the bridge was built the locals sent a cat across for the devil to claim its soul. Then for many years afterwards no person would cross, just in case – a legend common to many devil's bridges in France.

At the time of its construction it became the world's largest bridge arch, being bigger than the Ponte della Maddalena in Italy which held the world record until then. It remained so until 1356, when the Castelvecchio Bridge in Verona became the new largest bridge. Damaged during the war of the First Coalition (1792-1797), French general Luc Siméon Auguste Dagobert wanted to blow it up to keep the Spanish army from going back to Catalonia. The bridge was saved just before being destroyed thanks to the action of Representative Joseph Cassanyes and restored later.

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Address

D115, Céret, France
See all sites in Céret

Details

Founded: 1321
Category:
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maris Lachaunieks (3 years ago)
Beautiful
Louis Casey-Gibbs (3 years ago)
Beauty of a bridge
Tamzin Vokes (4 years ago)
Beautiful bridge but currently under restoration so unable to walk on it.
Andrew Kelly (4 years ago)
Most picturesque part of town
alay paun (4 years ago)
Cool old bridge with local legend...
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