Elne Cathedral

Elne, France

The Romanesque style Elne Cathedral was consecrated in 1069. In 1285, during the Aragonese Crusade, French troops sacked the town and massacred the townspeople who had taken refuge in the cathedral.

Work began on rebuilding the cathedral in the 14th century but was never finished, which explains the irregular appearance of the main facade - the tower on the right was built at this time but not the tower on the left, so a much smaller tower was added later instead. The cathedral is notable for the lack of decorative stonework on the outside.

The cloisters were also built over the course of three hundred years, which explains why some parts are more ornamented than others - despite this the closters are very beautiful, with marble arches featuring interesting capital stones surrounding a nicely maintained garden. The cloisters now also contain a Museum of History and a Museum of Archaeology.

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Address

Rue de l'Église 1, Elne, France
See all sites in Elne

Details

Founded: 1069
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.francethisway.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cesc Soriano (20 months ago)
Preciosa i plena d'historia
Brigitte Leger (20 months ago)
Très très bien
Markos Malliarakis (2 years ago)
Elne est un lieu d'histoire intéressant à propos du commerce de produits agricoles. L'église, prieuré, cloître et exposition font lien avec le passé montrant deux enceintes du bourg, église antérieure en cours de fouilles et actuelle en cours de rénovation. La visite s'effectue par une seule entrée signalé 'cloître' ... qualité des lieux et documentation disponible valent largement le modeste droit d'entrée.
Jennifer Longhurst (4 years ago)
. A magnificent structure rising up on the plain of Roussillon. This is a solid structure, monolithic in appearance. The town of Elne - named after Helena, the mother of the Emperor Constantine - has at its centre the "Ville Haute " - the High Town. This is built on a huge rocky outcrop that is today invisible under the winding streets and houses bulit up over the centuries. Crowning this is the Cathedral and its Cloisters, with around them an open space from where you can peer down (take care!) into the busy streets below. .
Nico G (5 years ago)
A masterpiece of Roman architecture set in a small village near Perpignan. Beautiful cloister. It was the seat of the former Bishopric of Elne, which was transferred to the Bishopric and cathedral of Perpignan in 1601.
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