Albertina museum houses one of the largest and most important print rooms in the world with approximately 65,000 drawings and approximately 1 million old master prints, as well as more modern graphic works, photographs and architectural drawings. Apart from the graphics collection the museum has recently acquired on permanent loan two significant collections of Impressionist and early 20th-century art, some of which will be on permanent display. The museum also houses temporary exhibitions.

The Albertina was erected on one of the last remaining sections of the fortifications of Vienna, the Augustinian Bastion. In 1744 the building was refurbished by Emanuel Teles Count Silva-Tarouca, to become his palace; it was therefore also known as Palais Taroucca. The building was later taken over by Duke Albert of Saxen-Teschen who used it as his residence. He later brought his graphics collection there from Brussels, where he had acted as the governor of the Habsburg Netherlands. He had the building extended by Louis Montoyer. Since then, the palace has immediately bordered the Hofburg. The collection was expanded by Albert's successors.

The collection was created by Duke Albert with the Genoese count Giacomo Durazzo, the Austrian ambassador in Venice. In 1776 the count presented nearly 1,000 pieces of art to the duke and his wife Maria Christina (Maria Theresa's daughter).

In early 1919, ownership of both the building and the collection passed from the Habsburgs to the newly founded Republic of Austria. In 1920 the collection of prints and drawings was united with the collection of the former imperial court library. The name Albertina was established in 1921.

In March 1945, the Albertina was heavily damaged by Allied bomb attacks. The building was rebuilt in the years after the war and was completely refurbished and modernized from 1998 to 2003. Modifications of the exterior entrance sequence, including a signature roof by Hans Hollein were completed 2008, when also the graphics collection finally reopened.

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Founded: 1805
Category: Museums in Austria

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

fabio palumbo (14 months ago)
I finally had the chance to visit the Albertina Museum and during the pandemic, so without tourists. I enjoyed the Exposition “Monet to Picasso”. Great paintings from private collections were included too. And the rooms of the palace are stunning too.
Dijana (15 months ago)
It turned out to be our favorite exhibition space in Vienna. The last exhibition before the pandemic - Albert Dürer - beautiful and we can’t wait for the new one. I hope it will be soon.
Danijel Korošec (2 years ago)
Just another Vienna's architecture that takes your breath away. I suggest you to stick around for half an hour, sit on a bench and observe people and traffic passing by to get a real feeling of the vibe here. P.S. You can take stairs or elevator for people with disabilities.
Ivan Spirydonau (2 years ago)
One of the most spectacular museums both in Vienna and Europe. Albertina is the place that conglomerates the most important art masterpieces in the world. It has huge collection of art from of various styles including impressionism. Furthermore it also hosts exhibitions regularly. Albertina is a must-visit place in Vienna. It is located right in the heart of the city - hard to miss. Make sure to allocate 3-4 hours. Definitely worth it!
Antonio Amoroso (2 years ago)
Starting with the architecture, ending with the kindness of the staff, the Albertina is a must see in Wien. From the bottom floor with the amazing Modern Art exposition to the top floor with the amazing paintings of legendary names...is been a wonderfull visit and i suggest everyone to take it. Right price, gorgeous structure, even in the royal's room. Top. No doubt about it. Thanks again to the curly girl at the wardrobe for her help :D
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