Albertina museum houses one of the largest and most important print rooms in the world with approximately 65,000 drawings and approximately 1 million old master prints, as well as more modern graphic works, photographs and architectural drawings. Apart from the graphics collection the museum has recently acquired on permanent loan two significant collections of Impressionist and early 20th-century art, some of which will be on permanent display. The museum also houses temporary exhibitions.

The Albertina was erected on one of the last remaining sections of the fortifications of Vienna, the Augustinian Bastion. In 1744 the building was refurbished by Emanuel Teles Count Silva-Tarouca, to become his palace; it was therefore also known as Palais Taroucca. The building was later taken over by Duke Albert of Saxen-Teschen who used it as his residence. He later brought his graphics collection there from Brussels, where he had acted as the governor of the Habsburg Netherlands. He had the building extended by Louis Montoyer. Since then, the palace has immediately bordered the Hofburg. The collection was expanded by Albert's successors.

The collection was created by Duke Albert with the Genoese count Giacomo Durazzo, the Austrian ambassador in Venice. In 1776 the count presented nearly 1,000 pieces of art to the duke and his wife Maria Christina (Maria Theresa's daughter).

In early 1919, ownership of both the building and the collection passed from the Habsburgs to the newly founded Republic of Austria. In 1920 the collection of prints and drawings was united with the collection of the former imperial court library. The name Albertina was established in 1921.

In March 1945, the Albertina was heavily damaged by Allied bomb attacks. The building was rebuilt in the years after the war and was completely refurbished and modernized from 1998 to 2003. Modifications of the exterior entrance sequence, including a signature roof by Hans Hollein were completed 2008, when also the graphics collection finally reopened.

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Founded: 1805
Category: Museums in Austria

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alessandro Calzolari (18 months ago)
It's kind of amazing for a museum of this level to sell access to all of its exhibits for the price of regular admission. Absolutely stunning service all around. Outstanding.
Dorina Plugaru (18 months ago)
Amazing museum in the heart of Vienna. Always interesting exhibitions with brief description (in German and English) of each work presented. There is a nice cafe inside the museum where one could have a coffee, dessert or full lunch.
Portik Hunor (18 months ago)
We were here for one of the best exposure, the 'Monet to Picasso'. They are already famous painters, so I'm not gonna describe them, but ad you can imagine, it was really fantastic. This was our first chance to see them at exhibitions, but the place was OK, stuffs too. As we were foreigners, they kindly get us to know every detail as well. We got one 'headphone', which task is to describe several but Not All! the pictures, so there were interesting parts as well, and for a low, 4€ cost is it good to have at least one! Bring headphones, because they didn't told us that part...
absolut madriz (19 months ago)
The Albertina Museum in Vienna's city center is great. The building was rebuilt in the years after the war and was completely refurbished and modernized from 1998 to 2003. Really good art/painting and photography exhibitions.
Mona Masslos (19 months ago)
Love this place and its surroundings. Seen some of my favorite artists and exhibitions here. Can become a bit crowded and entry is not cheap. The souvenir store is also quite nice. If possible bring your student ID or get a year pass, which I think is worth it when living in Vienna.
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