Augustinian Church

Vienna, Austria

Augustinian Church was originally built in 1327 as the parish church of the imperial court of the Habsburgs. In 1634, the Augustinerkirche became the parish church of the imperial church. As imperial church, many Habsburg weddings took place there, including the wedding of Archduchess (and future Empress) Maria Theresa in 1736 to Duke Francis of Lorraine, the wedding of Archduchess Marie Louise in 1810 to Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte of France, and the wedding of Emperor Franz Joseph in 1854 to Duchess Elisabeth in Bavaria.

The nave was built under architect Dietrich Landtner from 1330 to 1339, but not consecrated until 1 November 1349. As the nearby Hofburg expanded, the Augustinerkirche gradually became engulfed by it and today is a part of the complex. Although inconspicuous from the outside, the inside is more ornate. During the reign of Emperor Joseph II, 18 side altars were removed in 1784 when the church was restored in the gothic style. A new side altar was added in 2004, dedicated to Emperor Karl I of Austria (1887–1922) who is on the path to being recognized as a saint by the Roman Catholic Church.

The Loreto Chapel, to the right of the main altar, holds the silver urns containing the hearts of Habsburg rulers, while their bodies are kept in the Imperial Crypt. Herzgruft contains the hearts of 54 members of the imperial family.

Notable among the church's monuments is the memorial to Archduchess Maria Christina of Austria sculpted by Antonio Canova, in 1805.

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Founded: 1327
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gregory Blackley (7 months ago)
I find quiet time with God here..... excellent place to escape to for praying bon a daily basis!
Thea (13 months ago)
This church is really impressive, thanks to its massive architecture and its marble-like walls and columns, that make the building look optically much higher. One of the main reasons why you should visit this church is the funerary monument for Maria Christina of Austria, a beautiful masterpiece of Canova, so meaningful and aesthetically pleasing, and so realistic too, thanks to Canova's talent.
Maire Sheehan (13 months ago)
The 3 stars reflect the plainness of the church rather than an indication of value of visit. As it was Sunday afternoon you could still smell the incense, added to the atmosphere. Useful 1 euro information machine which fills the information gap.
Alice H (14 months ago)
Great Sunday church service with free concert at 11am. Nice experience even if you observe other religions
Dr. Steven Warren Suddath (15 months ago)
The Augustinian Church is a venerable place with a great history. It was the wedding church of the Imperial Family of Habsburg. I had the extraordinary honour that I could marry there myself, at Silvester 1919. It was a very romantic wedding with great organ music from Bach and Widor. A lot of tourists were that much fascinated by the wedding that they filmed, photographed and entered the chapel where the holy covenant took place, for watching the whole cerenony...
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