Kunsthistorisches Museum

Vienna, Austria

The Kunsthistorisches Museum is an art museum in Vienna. Housed in its festive palatial building on Ringstraße, it is crowned with an octagonal dome. It is the largest art museum in the country.

It was opened around 1891 at the same time as the Naturhistorisches Museum, by Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria-Hungary. The two museums have similar exteriors and face each other across Maria-Theresien-Platz. Both buildings were built between 1871 and 1891 according to plans drawn up by Gottfried Semper and Karl Freiherr von Hasenauer.

The two Ringstraße museums were commissioned by the Emperor in order to find a suitable shelter for the Habsburgs' formidable art collection and to make it accessible to the general public. The façade was built of sandstone. The building is rectangular in shape, and topped with a dome that is 60 meters high. The inside of the building is lavishly decorated with marble, stucco ornamentations, gold-leaf, and paintings.

The museum's primary collections are those of the Habsburgs, particularly from the portrait and armour collections of Ferdinand of Tirol, the collections of Emperor Rudolph II and the collection of paintings of Archduke Leopold Wilhelm, of which his Italian paintings were first documented in the Theatrum Pictorium.

Notable works in the picture gallery include masterpieces from Jan van Eyck, Albrecht Dürer, Tintoretto, Rembrandt, Pieter Brueghel the Elder and Peter Paul Rupens.

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Address

Burgring 5, Vienna, Austria
See all sites in Vienna

Details

Founded: 1891
Category: Museums in Austria

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

S.C. K. (10 months ago)
In my opinion a must-see for tourists and locals. The museum itself is a piece of art, one of the most beautiful and impressive buildings in Vienna (from the in-and outside). Take a look and have a coffee&cake in the "Kaffeehaus" inside the museum. You won't regret a visit!
Robin Singaroyan (10 months ago)
What's unique about this museum is the building. During the time of the built no expense was spared permitting the architects to employ the best, get the best material and make this building a gem for the centuries to follow! Building something like this would be impossible now as no government would be permitted to spend so lavishly! The artifacts are equally good and diverse. You could spend an afternoon just admiring the ceilings! Even the cafe in the building is a work of art.. Been here twice and will likely be back!
AB S (11 months ago)
THE MUSEUM! You really have to see it! The Louvres in comparison is half way... They have such an incredible amount of marvels, treasure and masterpieces! It's just incredible they are not more famous! All the masterpieces seen in books or TV since always are there.
Natalia K (12 months ago)
It has always been an amazing experience. Every time I enter those halls I find something new to see, even if considering that I was there many times before. It takes many hours to examine those fantastic art objects.
Aakshi Wadhwa (12 months ago)
No doubt exceptionally beautiful and very well curated. But you need at least 5 hours to see everything properly. And the cafe inside is superb. Amazing food . I am a vegetarian so generally everywhere else less options always and average food. Though not much veg options, but the vital wrap I had was really yum.
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