Kunsthistorisches Museum

Vienna, Austria

The Kunsthistorisches Museum is an art museum in Vienna. Housed in its festive palatial building on Ringstraße, it is crowned with an octagonal dome. It is the largest art museum in the country.

It was opened around 1891 at the same time as the Naturhistorisches Museum, by Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria-Hungary. The two museums have similar exteriors and face each other across Maria-Theresien-Platz. Both buildings were built between 1871 and 1891 according to plans drawn up by Gottfried Semper and Karl Freiherr von Hasenauer.

The two Ringstraße museums were commissioned by the Emperor in order to find a suitable shelter for the Habsburgs' formidable art collection and to make it accessible to the general public. The façade was built of sandstone. The building is rectangular in shape, and topped with a dome that is 60 meters high. The inside of the building is lavishly decorated with marble, stucco ornamentations, gold-leaf, and paintings.

The museum's primary collections are those of the Habsburgs, particularly from the portrait and armour collections of Ferdinand of Tirol, the collections of Emperor Rudolph II and the collection of paintings of Archduke Leopold Wilhelm, of which his Italian paintings were first documented in the Theatrum Pictorium.

Notable works in the picture gallery include masterpieces from Jan van Eyck, Albrecht Dürer, Tintoretto, Rembrandt, Pieter Brueghel the Elder and Peter Paul Rupens.

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Address

Burgring 5, Vienna, Austria
See all sites in Vienna

Details

Founded: 1891
Category: Museums in Austria

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

L.A Catalina (3 months ago)
It's a wonderful Museum what make you feel the beautiful past art. Few hours are not enough to see it all.
Yaroslav Kurennoy (4 months ago)
Great museum. Comprehensive exhibitions. Nice time to spend with kids.
Evelyn Emily (7 months ago)
Highly recommended to visit this place .....Extremely amazing museum .....I never saw this museum in my life
Vad Bo (7 months ago)
For those of you who will be lucky enough to gain entry to Austria in the foreseeable future, Covid policy willing, I highly recommend this outstanding art gem. The Museum is huge and hosts within an unimaginable amount of art and antiques from various classic periods. The most breathtaking area is the Kunstkamer, with the most amazing collection of luxurious jewellery and art that I personally had the chance to see. The levels of craftsmanship and imagination invested there probably cannot be surpassed. Oh, btw, the place is huge. I've hardly covered 3/4 of it in 3 days of fully invested visits.
Barun Roy (9 months ago)
Great collections and full of elegance.
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