Rosenburg Castle

Rosenburg, Austria

Rosenburg castle is one of Austria's most visited Renaissance castles. It is situated in the middle of a nature reserve which adds to its appeal. The Rosenburg was mentioned in a document for the first time in 1175, in relation to the area of the border along the Kamp River between Poigreich and the Babenberg settlements with the centres, the Benedictine Altenburg Abbey and the Gars-Thunau castle complex.

The Grabner brothers acquired the Rosenburg in 1487. From 1593–97, under the rule and by order of Sebastian Grabner, a Lutheran, most of the Gothic Rosenburg was demolished and the castle was reconstructed in Renaissance style with 13 towers. The Rosenburg remained in the possession of the Grabner family until 1604.

Finally, the Rosenburg became the property of the House of Sprinzenstein. A period of neglect followed, then several tragedies struck. Lightning caused a fire in 1721, and another fire broke out in 1751 which destroyed part of the courtyard gate and the chapel. In 1800, another fire damaged the Rosenburg; it was barely used for some 60 years thereafter. Fortunately, the Romantic Era caused a renewed interest in castles, and the castle was renovated by Count Ernst Carl von Hoyos-Sprinzenstein senior rebuilt the castle at great personal expense between 1859 and 1889. The castle is now a museum.

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Details

Founded: 1593-1597
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

mischa wozak (2 years ago)
Beautiful castle, and gardens nice but over priced falconry.
Feldgasse Forever (2 years ago)
The falconry was worth the entrance fee on its own. Also took a guided tour of the castle with a very knowledgeable guide who was great with the kids. Had lunch there and spent around five hours there. We didn't have time to see the Erlebnispark part.
Eugene Lindell (2 years ago)
See birds of prey in action. The falconers have more than falcons on call, but also eagles, owls, and vultures. All in all a spectacular show in a classy setting.
Les Rhoades (2 years ago)
Worth a visit and don't miss the Falcon show. Free parking. There is a cafe inside for food and drinks.
Andrea (2 years ago)
combination of services in all tickets is not good, if you want to just take a walk in the garden you have to buy ticket to falconry and I am really not interested in it. Anyway some other people may enjoy it.
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