The Semmering railway, which starts at Gloggnitz and leads over the Semmering to Mürzzuschlag was the first mountain railway in Europe built with a standard gauge track. It is commonly referred to as the world's first true mountain railway, given the very difficult terrain and the considerable altitude difference that was mastered during its construction. It is still fully functional as a part of the Southern Railway which is operated by the Austrian Federal Railways.

The Semmering railway was constructed between 1848 and 1854 by some 20,000 workers under the project's designer and director Carl von Ghega born in Venice as Carlo Ghega in an Albanian family. The construction features 14 tunnels (among them the 1,431 m vertex tunnel), 16 viaducts (several two-story) and over 100 curved stone bridges as well as 11 small iron bridges. The stations and the buildings for the supervisors were often built directly from the waste material produced in the course of tunnel construction.

In 1998 the Semmering railway was added to the list of the UNESCO World Heritage sites.

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Founded: 1848-1854
Category: Industrial sites in Austria

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nathan Guo (2 years ago)
the infrastructure is excellently built. Like the panorama view a lot. for hiking it's very memorable experience
Csak Panka (2 years ago)
Szép, modern vasút, de a sok viaduktból szinte semmi sem látszik.
Paweł Maryńczak (2 years ago)
Linia kolejowa na Semmering, zbudowana w latach 1848-1854, należy do największych osiągnięć sztuki inżynierskiej początków kolejnictwa. Pokonuje ona wysokogórską trasę o długości 41 km. Dzięki doskonałości konstrukcyjnej tuneli, wiaduktów i innych obiektów, linia kolejowa służy nieprzerwanie do czasów obecnych. Przecina ona wspaniały krajobraz górski, w który wtapiają się liczne domy wypoczynkowe powstałe, kiedy - dzięki budowie linii kolejowej - w okolice zaczęli napływać turyści.
Gabriela Cristea (5 years ago)
Landscape
Rayee CY (5 years ago)
It's amazing place to hiking from Semmering to Breitenstein, even though it's raining. BEAUTIFUL!
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