Neuberg Abbey is one of the few extant set of monastic buildings in Austria to have retained its medieval character to any great extent.

The abbey was founded in 1327 as a filial monastery of Stift Heiligenkreuz by the Habsburg Duke Otto the Merry, who died here in 1339. It was suppressed in 1786 by Emperor Joseph II. In 1850, the partly ruined premises were converted for use as a hunting lodge for Emperor Franz Joseph I. The buildings were later owned by the Austrian Forestry Department, until 2006.

Construction on the monumental High Gothic hall church began about 1330 and was not completed until the reign of Frederick III, in 1496. The roof-timbers from the first half of the 15th century contain more than 1100 m³ of larch wood and constitute the largest and most important construction of this sort in the German-speaking world. The church interior is dominated by the Baroque high altar, dating from 1612. The life-size sandstone statue of the 'Neuberger Madonna' and several side-altars date from the Gothic period.

After the dissolution of the monastery, it became the parish church of Neuberg.

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Founded: 1327
Category: Religious sites in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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Franz AIGNER (4 years ago)
Top imperial apartment!
Ingrid Hock (5 years ago)
The next 3 weekends is a beautiful Christmas market here. Great pen, very nice
Andreas Hodac (5 years ago)
great place and wonderful glassblowing at affordable prices!
Boris Novák (5 years ago)
We saw the glassmaker's work with our own eyes!
Ani Lieb (5 years ago)
Es war schönes Wetter,und trotzdem nicht überfüllt mit leuten
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